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•M25 

11919 




THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



The James Sprunt Historical Publications 

PUBLISHED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF 

The North Carolina Historical Society 

Editors: 

J. G. DeROULHAC HAMILTON 
HENRY McGILBERT WAGSTAFF 
WILLIAM WHATLEY PIERSON, JR. 



VOL. 16 



No. 2 







CONTENTS 

THE DIARY OF BARTLETT YANCEY 
MALONE 

THE PROVINCIAL AGENTS OF 
NORTH CAROLINA 



CHAPEL HILL 

PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY 

1919 



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THE LIBRARY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 

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ENDOWED BY THE 

DIALECTIC AND PHILANTHROPIC 

SOCIETIES 



E605 
.M25 
1919 



00005791574 



This book is due at the WALTER R. DAVIS LIBRARY on 
the last date stamped under "Date Due." If not on hold it 
may be renewed by bringing it to the library. 



DATE 
DUE 



RET. 



DATE 
DUE 



RET. 



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Jill 9 1995 



JUL I 



JUL 05* 



1998 



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Form No, 51: 
Rev. 1184 



THE UNIVERSITY OF NORTH CAROLINA 



The James Sprunt Historical Publications 



PUBLISHED UNDER THE DIRECTION OF 



The North Carolina Historical Society 



r 
■ 



Editors: 

J. G. DeROULHAC HAMILTON 
HENRY McGILBERT WAGSTAFF 
WILLIAM WHATLEY PIERSON, JR. 



VOL. 16 






No. 2 




CONTENTS 

THE DIARY OF BARTLETT YANCEY 
MALONE 



ROVINCIAL AGENTS OF 
PRTH CAROLINA 



CHAPEL HILL 

PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY 

1919 




THE DIARY OF BARTLETT YANCEY 
MALONE 

EDITED BY 
WILLIAM WHATLEY PIERSON, JR. 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hil 



http://archive.org/details/diaryofbartlettymalo 



INTRODUCTORY NOTE 



The following is the diary of a North Carolina farmer, Bart- 
lett Yancey Malone, who fought during the American War of 
Secession from July, 1861, to November, 1863, when he was cap- 
tured and made prisoner. He entered the Confederate Army at 
the age of twenty-three as a private and rose to the rank of a 
sergeant, being a member during his active service of the 6th 
North Carolina Regiment. As he said, this regiment at the time 
of his capture in battle on the Rappahannock River belonged to 
"General Hooks (Hoke) brigard Early Division Ewels Corps 
Leas Armey. ' ' As his story shows, Malone participated in most 
of the great battles and campaigns in Virginia, Maryland and 
Pennsylvania. After his capture, November 7, 1863, he was im- 
prisoned at Point Lookout, Maryland, where he remained until 
February 24th, 1865. 

An inquiry as to the justification for the publication of this 
document would be pertinent, for on a cursory reading it seems 
little more than an extended weather report. Mr. Malone per- 
formed no extraordinary feat of heroism, at least none such was 
recorded ; he participated with individual distinction in no poli- 
tical movement of importance ; he played no role which would 
cause historians to single him out for particular notice. His 
diary is reproduced here as a document of human interest which 
reveals, with much quaintness of expression, the thoughts of a 
simple soldier of the ranks — the thoughts, it is to be presumed, of 
a mass of men, which have oftentimes been inarticulate. There 
is a frankness about this diary that conveys inevitably, I believe, 
the conviction of sincerity. And there is a lack of emotion — as 
when in remarking on an event which, we are told, caused the sol- 
diers great grief, the death of Stonewall Jackson, he merely said, 
"And General Jackson died to-day, which is the 10th day of 
May" — an absence of bitterness and of complaints which, con- 
sidering the provocation of circumstances, make the diary of al- 
most as much interest because of these omissions as because of 
what is included. Perhaps the most conspicuously absent feature 



6 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

is that of any statement of the Southern cause for which he was 
fighting. Not only does the writer refrain from criticism of the 
North, but he omits to tell why he is fighting for the South. He 
assumes the Southern cause tacitly and of course. Mr. Malone was 
chiefly concerned with his job of being a soldier and, as there 
was no passion nor rancor in his story, there was likewise no ex- 
altation nor fervid declamation. He asserted no particular 
knowledge of military events nor predicted the result of any en- 
gagement. "What the result is to be is more than I no." He 
did not seem to have been especially elated by victory, and he 
was certainly not demoralized by defeat — not even that of 
Gettysburg. He committed himself on rare occasions to expres- 
sions which manifested a confidence in the ultimate outcome, as 
after a successful battle he said: ""We whipt them like we aul- 
ways do. ' ' He was unconsciously a brave man who took a sober 
sort of joy in fighting. On one occasion, when alluding to a battle 
of more than four hours in length, which began about three 
o 'clock in the afternoon, he remarked : "we had a wright nice 
time of it from then on tell dark." There is no notice taken of 
the horrors of war, of bloody scenes which he must have witnessed 
on the battlefield ; nor were there any complaints made of the 
pains of the wounds he received. His attitude toward the enemy 
was unemotional, almost indifferent. He sometimes referred to 
the federal soldiers as "the Scamps," which, in view of the 
heated controversies of the time, must certainly be regarded as a 
mild term of reproach. It is true that he designated General 
Benjamin F. Butler as the "Yankee beast," but that was an ex- 
pression then so current in the South as to be conventional so far 
as Butler was concerned. Having done with these negative, 
though very significant, aspects, it might be said that, judging 
from the diary, Malone was chiefly thinking — possibly from a 
farmer's habit — of the weather with its attendant pleasures and 
discomforts and about food. 

One persistent habit of Malone was to record the texts of 
sermons which he heard, together with references to their biblical 
rources. This practice, in addition to revealing some interesting 
evidence as to the nature of Civil War sermons, will remind some 



The Diary of Bartlett Yancey Malone 7 

readers of the time when it was considered a cardinal sin to be 
unable to quote and cite the preacher's text. Religion affected 
him in this way not only, but it influenced his poetry. 

That part of the diary which describes Malone 's experience 
as a prisoner at Point Lookout is, I think, an important and valu- 
able addition to the limited, first-hand material dealing with 
Southerners in Northern prisons. It was when writing his reflec- 
tions on prison life that the first note of despair comes into his 
journals. His criticism of the treatment of prisoners there may 
be summarized under four heads : First, there was not food 
enough. ' ' Our rations at Point Lookout was 5 crackers and a 
cup of coffee for Breakfast. And for dinner a small ration of 
meat 2 crackers three potatoes and a cup of soup. Sugar we 
have non. " Later he described the food supplied by saying, 
' ' Our Rations gets no better we get half a loaf of bread a day a 
smal slice of Pork or Beef or Sault Beef for Breakfast for dinner 
a cup of Been Soup and Supper we get non. ' ' Coffee and sugar, 
which last commodity had for a time been supplied, had 
been taken away. At one time his friends caught, cooked and 
ate a rat. Secondly, he wrote of the poor protection against the 
cold afforded the prisoners. Many had to sleep on the ground 
with only one blanket. "All the wood we get at Point Lookout 
is one sholder tirn of pine brush every other day for a tent. 16 
men to every tent. ' ' He recorded that five men froze to death on 
one night. Thirdly, he mentioned the frequent shooting of pris- 
oners by the guards for trivial reasons. At one time he states 
that a prisoner was shot and killed by the guard "for no reason 
attall. " Fourthly, he rather bitterly resented the placing of 
negroes as guards over him. 

It will seem strange to some that the writer of this diary 
should have spelled General Lee's name, which undoubtedly was 
very familiar to him, as "Lea." This spelling of the famous 
name may be explained by the fact, of which I have been in- 
formed, that in Caswell County there were a number of people 
who spelled their name "Lea," as, indeed, did an officer of 
Malone 's regiment. This and other orthographic curiosities must 



8 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

be considered in the light of the fact that he was a graduate of 
the "corn field and tobacco patch" university. 

No serious editing has been undertaken. Outside of an oc- 
casional attempt to indicate in some cases the accurate form of 
certain proper names and places, the diary has been allowed to 
stand without comment as written. 

William Whatley Pierson, Jr. 
Chapel Hill, N. 0., March 25, 1919. 



THE DIARY OF 
BARTLETT YANCEY MALONE 



Bartlett Y. Malone was bornd and raised in North Carolina 
Caswell Comity in the Year of our Lord 1838. And was Gradgu- 
ated in the corn field and tobacco patch : And inlisted in the 
war June the 18th 1861. And was a member of the Caswell 
Boys Company which was comanded by Captian Michel (A. A. 
Mitchell) : And was attached to the 6th N. C. Regiment the 
9th day of July '61 which was comanded by Colonel Fisher who 
got kild in the first Manassas Battel which was July 21, 1861. 
And then was comanded by Colonel W. D. Pender untell the 
Seven Pines fight which was fought the 30th day of May '61. # 
And then Colonel W. D. Pender was promoted to Brigadier Gen- 
eral. And then Captain I. E. Avry (Avery) of Co. E was pro- 
moted to Lieutenant Colonel who was in comand untell about the 
10th of October when he was promoted to Colonel and still staid 
in comand untell the 2th day of July 1863 which was the day the 
fite was at Gettysburg whar he was kild. And then Lieut : 
Colonel Webb taken comand. 

Look hear Mr. Johnston did you ever go to Scolidge 
I dont no : I guess you mean coledg dont you, Bans : 
Yes, that what I said Scoledg : 

Oh go way from hear negro you dont no what you ar a talken 
about 

Yes I do dat just what I said. 



His purposes will riper fast 
Unfolding evry hour 
The bud may have a bitter taste 
But sweet will be the flower 



* For a history of the Sixth Regiment, see Clark (editor), North Carolina Regi- 
ments, 1S61-1865, Vol. I (1901). 



10 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

May your days be days of pleasure 
May your nites be nites of rest 
May you obtain lifes sweetest pleasure 
And then be numbered with the blest. 



Whar ere you rome 
What ere your lot 
Its all I ask 
Forget me not. 

Remember me when I am gon 
Dear friend remember me 
And when you bow befour the throne 
then remember me. 



You are a charming little dandy 
Sweeter than the sweetest candy. 



Candy is sweet 
It is very clear 
But not half so sweet 
As you my dear 



One day amidst the plas 
"Where Jesus is within 
Is better than ten thousen days 
Of pleasure and of Sin 

for grace our hearts to soften 
Teach us Lord at length to love 
We alas forget too often 
What a friend we have above. 



The Diary of Bartlett Yancey Malone 11 

All I like of being a Whale 
Is a water Spout and a tail. 



A certen cewer for the Toothack if the tooth is hollow take a 
pease of the scale that is on a horses leg and put it in the hollow 
of the tooth It is a serten cewer so sais J. H. Lyon. 

B. Y. M. 



B. Y. MALONE'S MEMORANDUM 

FOR THE YEAR 1862 



The first day of January was a beautyfull day 

And William Hester died the last day of Dec. 1861 

The 2 day was a beautyfull one and nothing happend of 
eney interest that day. 

The 3 day was also a prittj T day. 

The 4 day we had a right smart snow and Mr. Compton is 
at our camp to day on a visit, 

The 5th which is the Sabath and ther is a right smart ice 
on the ground to day And Bethel is a cooking I. H. Jonstons 
big turkey for dinner. 

The 6th day was a veiy coal one indeed and the snow is 
about a half of a inch deep on the ground to day and Mr. I. T. 
Compton left our camp to day for home. 

The 7th day I was on gard and it was a very coal day. 

The 8th day was also coal and me and Bethel washed our 
close to day. 

The 9th day was a beautyfull And Mr. Thomas Martin 
arived at our camp today on a visit, 

The 10 day was cloud}- but not much rain And I wrote a 
letter to S. F. Compton today. 

The 11 day was a very pritty day over head but powerfull 
muddy under foot, And nothing happend to day worth a 
naming. 

The 12 day which is the Sabath and it is a beautifull sun- 
shiney day And me and Young eat our big oposam today for 
dinner and indeed it was sum good. 

The 13 was a very nice day indeed. 

The 14 day the snow was about shoe mouth deep And Mr. 
Clover and Young and Joshua and my self went a rabbit hunt- 
ing and caught one scpiirl And indeed we saw a heep of fun 
that day. 

The 15 day was a very bad day it raind all day and freezed 



The Diary of Bartlett Yancey Malone 13 

as it fell and at night there was about as much ice on the treese 
as I ever saw in my life. 

The 16 day was a wright warm day and the snow nearley 
all melted off of the ground by night 

The 17 day was very cool and cloudy 

The 18 day was sloppy day And I hird today that peas 
was made between the North and South and I hird that our 
men sunk a vessel down on the Potomac last night But indeed 
I dont beleave a word of it. 

The 19 day was a raney one and our Company was on picket 
gard at Greenwood Church which is in about 9 miles from Poco- 
quan And Mr. I. F. Richmond arived at our camp to day on 
a visit. 

The 20 day and it is still araning and nothing happend to- 
day of any interest 

The 21 is cloudy and a railing And I am on gard today at 
the camp 

The 22 was cloudy but no rain 

The 23 was cloudy and cool but no rain And thir was hevy 
canonading down on the Potomac to day 

The 24 was cool and cloudy in the morning and in the eavn- 
ing it was a snowing And Mr. Oliver and Young went to 
Dumpfreese to day for witnesses for Mr. B. Murphey. 

The 25 was a very cool day and Young went back to Dum- 
frieze to day again for witnes for B. Murphey. 

The 26 which was the Sabath was a beautyfull day indeed 

The 27 was a warm sunshiney day and we all went out on 
drill to day for the first time in too months And the Colonel 
praysed ous all and said that he was glad that we had not for- 
goten how to drill 

The 28th day was cloudy in the morning and clear in the 
eavning And I hope the Lieutenants get sum logs today to 
put a flower (floor) in his hous 

The 29 was a very pritty warm day, but after night it 
comenced raning And I was on gard to day And my post 
was right befour the Colonels house door. 

The 30 day was a raney day and nothing happend to day 



14 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

onley me and Marshal Walker was a playing and I hurt my face 
with a fence rail 

The 31 day was cloudy but not much rain And nothing 
happend today worth a menshionen. 

B. Y. Malone. 

The Month of February 1862 

The first day of February was a raney day indeed And 
nothing happened to day of eney interest 

The 2 day which was the Sabath was a very warm day 

The 3 day was a very bad day it snowed all day long and at 
night the snow was about six inches deep 

The 4 day was a very nice day over head and the snow 
melted very fast all day, and we boys saw a heep of fun that 
tlay a snow bawling 

The 5 day was a very warm sunshiney day and the snow 
was nearly all melted off of the ground by night And nothing 
happend to day worth a namen 

The 6 day was a very raney one And Lieutenant Lea and 
Sergeant Couvington and H. Rudd and Mr. Balden all started 
home to day as recruiting officers. 

The 7 day was cold and cloudy And I was on gard to day 

The 8 day was very cool And Lieutenant Lea was promoted 
to Captian And Sergeant Olover promoted to Second Lieutenant 
to day And Nat Hester promoted to fourth Corporal 

The 9 day which was the Sabath was a very pritty day And 
Thomas Grinsted dide to day he was a private in Captian Leas 
Company 

The 10 day was clear but cool And we went out on drill 
today for the first time in severl weeks. 

The 11 day was a very cool day And me and Cousin Ander- 
son went down to the fourth Alabama Reg in a visit. 

The 12 day was a very pritty day indeed and I went to 
Dumfrieze today and then returned home 

The 13th day was a pritty warm sunshiney day And we 
went on drill twist that day. 

The 14th day a wright coal day. 



The Diary of Bartlett Yancey Malone 15 

The 15 day was a very bad day indeed it snowed all day 
long and at night the snow was about 3 inches deep on the 
ground 

The 16 day was a clear day and the snow melted a little 
And Mr. Luther Rudd dide to day about 8 oclock in the morning 

The 17 day was a very bad day it rained all day and friezed 
as it fell. 

The 18 day was cloudy but warm and the ice melted off and 
I was on gard that day 

The 19 day was a very raney day indeed And Mr. I. R. 
Hester And Calvin Snipes arived at our camp today on a visit 

The 20 day was a beautifull day it looked like the spring of 
the year and Mr. I. R. Moore left our camps today to go home 
on a furlough 

The 21 day was cool and cloudy And ther was a wright 
smart excitement in camp today It was repoted that the Yankees 
Was a landing at Colchester 

The 22 day was cloudy and it rained a little in the morning 
And Mr. I. R. Hester and N. Snips left our camp today for home 

The 23 day was cloudy but not much rain 

The 24 day was clear and very windey indeed 

The 25 day was clear and cool And A. I. Brincefield started 
home today on a sick furlough 

The 26 day was cloudy but not much rain 

The 27 day was clear and Brother Albert arrived at our 
camps today on a visit 

The 28 day was clear but very windey and cool And ther 
was a wright smart stir in camps today for we had orders to 
pack our knapsacks and to be ready to march at a moments 
warning but wher we was to go too we did not no. Spring is 
now come. B. Y. Malone. 

The Month of March 1862 

The 1 day of March was clear and very cool And I was on 
gard in the day but being unwell I got excused from standing 
after night 



16 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

The 2 day it snowed tell the snow was about 2 inches on the 
ground. 

The 3 day was cloudy and rained nearley all day 

The 4 day was clear and cool and our company was on picket 
gard today at Greenwood Chirch 

The 5 day was cloudy but no rain And Brother Albert left 
our camps today for home 

The 6 day clear in the morning and cloudy in the eavning 
And snowed o little And we had orders today from General 
Whiten (W. H. Whiting) to drill twist every day hear after 

The 7 day was clear but very cool and we have orders to cook 
too days rations and be ready to march in the morning but 
where we are agoing is more than I no 

The 8 day of March was cloudy and cool And our Regiment 
left camp Fisher today for Camp Barton 

The 9 day was clear and warm And we marched about 15 
miles to daj^ on toward Camp Barton 

The 10 day was cloudy and raining in the morning but no 
rain in the eavning And we arrived at camp Barton about 3 
oclock in the eavning which is about 2 miles west of Frederks- 
burg (Fredericksburg) 

The 11 day was a beautyfull warm sunshiney day and we 
cleaned our streets and struck our tents today 

The 12 day was a beautyfull spring day and nothing occurd 
of eney interest 

The 13 day was warm and clear 

The 14 day was warm and cloudy but no rain And I was 
on gard at Camp Barton for the first time. 

The 15 day was a very raney day indeed 

The 16 day which was the Sabath was cloudy but no rain 
And our recruits got in today and the number of them was 45 

The 17 day was cool and cloudy but no rain and I hurd today 
that we had to march back to Richmond 

The 18 day was clear and warm And Lieutenant Colonel 
Lightfoot of the 6th N. C. S. T. was promoted to Colonel of the 
5th Alabama Regt today 

The 19 day was cloudy and cool 



The Diary of Bartlett Yancey Malone 17 

The 20 day was raney and very cool indeed 

The 21 day cloudy and cool but no rain 

The 22 day cloudy and sum rain And I was on gard and the 
counter sign was York Town 

The 23 day which was the Sabath was a beautyfull spring 
day and I went to Frederksburg to preaching And the preach- 
ers text was in St. John 3 chap and 18 virse 

The 23 day cool and cloudy 

The 24 cool and cloudy 

The 25 was a beautyfull day 

The 26 was also a nice day 

The 27 warm and clear 

The 28 was a beautyfull spring day and we have orders this 
eavning to cook 3 days rashers And I hird severl cannons fyer- 
ing this eavning but what is to be the result is more than I no 

The 29 day it raind and haild and snowed and sleated and 
friezed and done a little of all that was bad And me and James 
Colmond went to Fredreksburg and went down to the landing 
and went in a steam boat for the first one we ever was in 

The 30 day which was the Sabath was cool and raney 

The 31 day was a beautyfull day and I was on gard and my 
post was befour the gard house door so nothing more. 

B. Y. Malone 

The Month of April 1862 

The 6 day of April which was the Sabath was a beautyfull 
spring day And I went to Fredericksburg to meating and the 
Preachers text was in the first Book of Kings 18 chapter and 21 
virse 

The 7 day was a pritty one 

The 8 day was cool and raney And our Regiment left Camp 
Barton in the morning and marched on toward Richmond threw 
the wind and water and waded the creaks as they went 

The 9 was still cool and raney and we continued our march 
And about 3 o'clock in the eavning as we was marching threw 
a little Town cauld Balden Green it comenced halen and raining 
on ous very hard And then it was about 3 miles to the Depot 



18 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

wher we was to take the cars And we all got very wet befour 
we got ther And then about sundown we got in sum old horse 
cars and was run to Ashland which was about 22 miles And 
when we got ther I was wet and nearly frosen And I was on 
gard and they put me on post wright away and I had to stand 

2 hours And it was a snowing a little while I was a standing 

The 10 day was cool and cloudy in the morning but cleerd 
off about twelve and we stade in Town all day 

The 11 day was a pritty clear day and we stade in Town 
untell eavning And in the eavning we went out in the woods 
about a mile from Town and struck our tents for the night 

The 12 day was a very pritty one 

The 13 day was also a nice one And William Jeffrus of our 
Company dide this morning And we had a Preacher to preach 
in our camp today and his text was in the Second Book of Kings 
6 chapter and 15 and 16 and 17 virses. 

The 14 of April was a very pritty day And our Regiment 
left Ashland for Yolktown (Yorktown) And our rought was 
down by Hanover Coathouse 

The Second day we still continued our march And also the 

3 and fourth we marched And the 5 day we marched and past 
threw the town of Williamsburg about 9 o'clock in the morning 
And about an hour before the sun set we arrived at General 
Johnston Headquarters which is in about a mile of Yolktown 
wher we stopt to wait for the Battle. 

The 29 day of April was a beautyful day And Calvin Snips 
got back today from home And the Reverant Mr. Stewart from 
Alexander preached in our camp this eavning and his text was 
this : I am the Lord of Host : 

The Month of May 

The 2 day of May was a beautyful one And we had orders 
to leave Yorktown And soon in the morning the wagons was 
loded and everything sent off but our knapsacks and about 12 
o'clock the Artillery was all plast (placed) in a line of battle 
acrost the field and about dark we was all marched out behind it 
and Colonel Pender told ous that they expected a large fight 



The Diary of Bartlett Yancey Malone 19 

the next day and we lade ther in the field all night with our 
guns by our side And next morning we marched out in the woods 
And we stade ther untell about 2 o 'clock in the night And then 
we was rousted up and marched about a half a mile and then 
for sume cause we was stopt and sent back And then about day- 
break we started again and taken the same road back that we 
come down And about 12 oclock we got to Williamsburg and 
we onley went about 4 miles futher tell we stopt to stay all night 
And about 4 oclock in the eavning the Yankees Calvery over- 
taken ours clost to Williamsburg and we had a little brush but 
our men whipt thirs and we onley lost one kild and 3 or 4 
wounded And we kild 9 of thirs and wounded severl and taken 
10 horses And the 5 day was a very raney one indeed and we 
was rousted up about 2 oclock in the night and marched all day 
threw the mud and water and at night we arived in about 2 miles 
of West Point 

The 6 day we stade in camp untell about one oclock And it 
was reported that the Yankees was alanding down at West Point 
and we was all run out in a file and plast in a line of battel ex- 
pecting a fight but did not and about dark we marched back to 
our camp and about 8 oclock in the night we marched about a 
mile to another plase for sum cause and then stade thar all night 
And the next morning which was the 8 was a beautyful one and 
the Yankees was alanding at West Point and about 8 o 'clock we 
was marched down to the intended battle field And from that 
time untell 12 oclock we was a scurmishing and a running from 
one place to another hunting the scamps And in the eavning 
we marched back in the woods and stade thar untell about 12 
oclock in the night And then marched about a mile futher back 
And stad thar all night And then as soon as day broke we started 
on our march again And about 3 oclock in the eavning we got 
to West Point coathouse whar we found General Johnston and 
all of his men And then we marched about 2 miles futher and 
stop for the night 

And the 9 day we rested untell about 12 oclock and then 
started out on our march again and befour we had gone a mile 
we hird that our Cavalry was attacked by the Yankees And 



20 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

then we had to stop and wate a while but we whipt them like we. 
aulways do And then we marched on but dident git but 3 miles 
that day And the 10 day we dident march but about a mile for 
we was expecting the Scamps to attack us but they did not 

The 11 day which was the second Sunday in May was a 
beautyfull day indeed And we rested all day And the Rev- 
erant Mr. Stewart from Alexander preached to us again today 

The 12 day we still stade in camp and Mr. Fossett preached 
for us today. And his text was in the first of Timothy 2 chapter 
and 8 virse 

The 13 day was clear and warm 

The 14 cloudy and a raining 

The 15 raney And we left Camp. Road today about 12 
oclock and marched on toward Richmond 

And the 16 we marched 

And the 17 we got to our camp clost to Richmond 

The 26 day of May was a nice one but about 12 oclock in the 
night it comenced raining very hard And about 1 oclock we 
was rousted up and did expect to attack the Yankees about day 
but it rained so hard we did not go 

And the 27 day it rained till about 10 oclock and then cleard 
off And about 3 oclock in the eavning the fight comenced down 
about Hanover Coathouse we surposed but we was not cauld out 
And I was promoted today to fourth Corporel 

The 28 day was clear and about a hour befour the sun set we 
left our camp And march all night down toward Hanover 
Coathouse And we past in about three hundred yards of the 
Yankeys pickets And then we stopt and rested about 3 hours 
And about 8 oclock the next day we started back and went about 
5 or 6 miles and stopt for the night 

And the next day we went back in about a mile and a half of 
Richmond and staid thar all night 

And the next morning which was the 30 we left and marched 
down toward Chickahominy And about three oclock in the 
eavning we was led in to the Battel field by Colonel Pender 
And we had a wright nice time of it from then tell dark 

And the next morning which Was the first day of June the 



The Diary op Bartlett Yancey Malone 21 

fight comenced a little before the sun rose And we was plast 
(placed) in a line of Battel And was expecting to go in to it 
evry minuet but we staid there all day and was not cauld on; 
General Longstreet divishion don the most of the fighting on 
Sunday And from that time till the 11th we stade in the Swamp 
down on Chickahominy River 

And the 11 day we left Chickahominy And went to Rich- 
mond and taken the cars and Went to the Junction that night 

And the next morning we left thar And about a hour bef our 
the sun set we arived at Linchburg 

And the 12 day we stade at Linchburg 

And the 13 day we got on the cars about dark and the next 
morning we found our relief at Sharlottsvill (Charlottesville) 
which was about 75 miles from Linchburg And we chainged 
cars at that plase And the 14 day we traveld threw the Moun- 
tins And about too hours befour the sun set we got to the 
little town cauld Staunton And we stade ther tell the 18 And 
the 18 which was just twelve months from the time I taken the 
oath we left Staunton And marched about 15 miles wright 
back the railroad the way we came down And stade all night 
at a little town cauld Wainsborough (Waynesboro) clost to the 
Turnel 

And the next morning we croust over the Blew ridg and 
marched to Mitchiners River And staid thar all night And 
the next morning which was the 20 we taken the cars at Mitch- 
iners River and road up to Sharlottsvill And then taken a 
railroad thar that went to Gordnesvill And we got to Gordnes- 
vill about 2 oclock in the eavning and we taken the Richmond 
Railroad thar And road about 25 miles toward Richmond 
at a station cauld Frederickshall And thar we got off 

The 21 we stade at Frederickshall 

And also the 22 we stade thar 

And the 23 we started out again on our march and marched 
all day long threw the hot sun and dust for it was very hot and 
dusty the 23 but it raind that night. 

And the next day (which was the 24) we still continued our 
rout and when we stopt for night we was in 6 miles of Ashland 



22 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

And the 25 we travield all day long and at night we campt 
a mile west of Ashland 

And the 26 we travield sloley down the Chickahominy River 
driving in the pickets as we went 

And the 27 we still went on and about 3 oclock in the eavning 
we come up with the main body of the Yankees (at Cold Harbor) 
and attacked them And from that time untell dark we had a 
wright warm time of it But we whipt them And in our com- 
pany A. Burk was kild and A. Tucker and Page was slitley 
wounded 

And the 28 we marched about a mile the other side of the 
battle field and stade thar all day, 

And the 29 we stade at the same place And about 2 oclock 
in the eavning we had orders to fall in to march but we did not 
go And as we was stacking our armes again one of Captain 
Tates men shot another one threw the thigh but it was don 
axidentley 

And the 30 we was rousted up about too oclock in the night 
and about day break we started out again And crost the 
Chickahominy River and marched untell we came to the York 
river Railroad 8 miles below Richmond And then we taken 
down the Railroad and about 2 hours befour sunset we come to 
a little creak whar the Yankees had burnt the bridg And left 
sum of thir peases thar to bumb us so we couldent build the 
bridge untell they could get thir armey futher along, And we 
never got the bridge built untell next morning about a half of 
a hour by sun 

The Month of July 1862 (Also August to December) 

And the next morning whitch was the first day of July just 
twelve months from the time I left home we crost over and 
about 10 oclock we overtaken the scamps again And they 
comenced throwing bumbs amung us And we amung them 
And thar was a very heavey canonading cept up all day And 
a little befour night the pickets comenced fyring And from 
that time untell about a hour in the night thar was very hard 
filing don indeed And a great meney kild and wounded on 



The Diary of Bartlett Yancey Malone 23 

boath sids in our company M. Miles L. Smith, B. Murphey, I. 
Calmond, G. Lyons And my self was all hurt 

And the next day which was the second was a very rany 
day indeed And our Regiment moved back in the woods a peas 
and stade thar all day 

And the next day we marched back about three miles toward 
Richmond and stopt for the night 

And the 4 day we marched down on James River about 25 
miles from Richmond 

And the 5 we stade at the same plase untell sun down And 
then our Regiment had to go on picket And we marched down 
in about a mile of the Yankees and sent out our detail 

And also the 6 day we was on picket at the same plase 

And the 7 day we was releaved about twelve oclock And 
then we marched back about a mile in the woods 

And the 8 we stade thar untell about 4 oclock in the eavning 
And then we started out for Richmond And we marched untell 
about 10 oclock in the night and we got as far as White Oak 
Swamp which was about 10 miles from the plase whar we 
started 

And the 9 day we started again about 4 oclock and we got in 
about 3 miles of Richmond And then we moved up in about a 
mile and a half of Richmond and taken up camp and the 11 we 
got sum flages and put them up And Mr. I. H. Compton ar- 
rived at our camp today on a viset 

And the 12 day we still stade in camp And also the 13 we 
stade in camp and Mr. I. H. Compton left our camps today for 
home for him. And we still staid at Richmond untell the 7 of 
August And then we left thar And marched about four miles 
toward Ashland And when we stopt it was dark And then our 
company had to go about 5% miles futher to stand picket and 
it was 12 oclock in the knight when we got to the plase whar we 
we was to stand: 

And the next morning we was releived and we had to go 
back to our Regiment again : 

And the 9 day we started out again about four oclock in the 
eavning and marched untell about one oclock in the knight 



24 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

And when we stopt we was about thre miles beyond Ashland 
which was about 15 miles from the plase whar we started from 

And the 10 day we started again about 4 oclock and we went 
as far as Hanover Junction which was about 6 miles 

And the 11 day we started in the morning and marched about 
5 miles down clost to a little river and stopt again to take up 
camp 

And the 14 day our Regt left thar and marched up toward 
Gordensvill And I was not able to go with them so they ex- 
cused me and started me back to the Hospital clost to Richmond 
And we had to walk to Hanover Junction which was about 4 
miles And we had to stay thar all next day for we could not 
get eny cars to tak us eney f uther 

And the 16 day we got on the cars about 8 oclock and got to 
the Hospital about 11 And then I staid at the Hospital untell 
the 2 day of September And then I taken the cars at Rich- 
mond and got as far as Gordensvill the first day 

And the 3 day we rode on the cars as far as Rapadan River 
and Bridg was burnt thar and then we had to walk from thar 
to our Regiment And it was 115 miles to Winchester And 35 
from thar to the Reg. but we left Rapadan the 4 day and walked 
up the railroad to Culpeper Coathouse which was 12 miles from 
Rapadan River 

And the 5 day we taken the turnpike road and marched as 
far as Warrenton Springs which was 18 miles from Culpeper 

And the 6 day we got to Warrenton about 12 oclock which 
was 7 miles from Warrenton Springs And by nite we got to a 
littel Town by the name of Baultimore And it was 5 miles from 
Warrenton 

And the 7 day we got to a littel town by the name of Hay- 
market about 12 oclock And we dident get but about 4 miles 
futher that day for we had to stop to get sompthing to eat 

And the 8 day we got as far as Aldie and it was about 15 
miles from Haymarket 

And the 9 day we got to Leasburg and it was about 12 miles 
from Aldie 

And the 10 day we past threw a littel town by the name of 



The Diary of Bartlett Yancey Malone 25 

Hamelton and it was about 5 miles west of Leasburg And the 
11 day we got to Snigerville about nite and it was 10 miles from 
Hamilton. 

And the 12 day we crost over the Blew ridge in the morning 
and about 10 oclock we crost Shandal River and it was about 4 
miles from Snigersville And by nite we got to Berrysville and 
it was 5 1/2 miles from Shanandoah 

And the 13 day we got to Windchester and it was about 10 
miles from Berryville 

And then we stade at Windchester untell the 16 and then we 
started to Harpersferry and we got as far as Berryville the first 
day and then taken the left hand road and got as far as Charles- 
town the 17 day 

And the 18 day we crost the Potomac at Shepards town about 
nite and it was 24 miles from Berryville 

And the 19 day we crost back again and got as far as Charles- 
town by night and the 20 day we got to Berryville again 

And the 21 we travaild untell we got in 4 miles of Windches- 
ter and then taken the wright hand road to go to Martinsburg 
and we past by the Burnt Factory and got as far as Jordons 
Sulphur Springs by night. 

And the 22 day we got to a littel town by the name of Buck- 
town and the 23 day we got to our Reg. and it was clost to 
Martinsburg and Martinsburg was about 22 miles from Wind- 
chester 

And then the 27 the Regiment left thar and marched in five 
miles of Windchester 

The 22 of October was cool and very windy indeed and the 
23 was clear and cool and we had a General revew 

And the 24 we left our old camp and marched about a mile 
near to Windchester to pease of woods and taken camps in them 
again 

And the 28 we left thar for Culpeper and got as far as 
Shanadoah River the first day 

And the 30 day the fields was white with froust and about 
sun up we waded the River at Front Royal and by night we got 
as far as a littel town by the name of Flint Hill 



26 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

And the 31 day we marched all day and got in five miles of 
Culpeper by nite 

And the first day of November we got to Culpeper 

And the second day which was the sabath I went to meating 
at Culpeper And the preachers text was in St : John 16 chapter 
7.8.9.10 and 11 virses 

And the 3 day we marched over to the old battel field at 
Sedar Run which was about 3 miles from Culpeper and stopt 
again for camp 

And the 7 day it snowed 

And the 8 day the Second and 11 Myssissippians left our 
Bregaid and the 54 and 57 N. C. taken thir plases 

And the 9 day was a very cool day 

And the 10 day was a pritty one indeed and thar was a very 
hevy canonading cept up all day sum whar between Culpeper 
and "Windchester and we had orders to cook rashions and ex- 
pected to be cauld on evry minnet but was not 

And the 18 day we left Culpeper for Fredericks and the 
first day we was as far as Rapidan River by nite and we marched 
all day threw the rain and mud the 20 and also the 21 and the 
22 we got to Fredericks about 12 o'clock 

And the 5 day of December it raind all day and about night 
it eomenced snowing and snowed untell it was about a inch and 
a half deep on the ground And the 6 day and 7 was very cool 
indeed 

And the 11 day the too signerl guns was fyerd just befour 
day and we was run out in a line of battel and kept so all day 
and the Yankees crost over the River that day 

And the 12 day we was marched around to the left of our 
armey and was expecting to have to fight every minnet but did 
not for thar was no fiting don except the pickets and canonading 

And the 13 we was marched back to the wright and laid in a 
line of battel all day under the Yankees shells but non of ous 
got hurt 

And that nite we was sent to the front on picket and laid 
clost to the enemey all nite and went marching about day we 
eomenced fyring at them and cept it up all day and there was 
about 15 kild and wounded in our Best : but non kild in our 



The Diary of Bartlett Yancey Malone 27 

Company, B. Richmond and P. S. Donahan was slightly 
wounded and that nite we marched back in the woods And we 
staid thar all day the next day and at nite we had to bild ous 
sum brest works 

And the next morning which was the 16 General Hood came 
riding up and said well Boys you all did such great works hear 
last nite that you scard the Yankees on the other side of the river 
but we staid thar all day 

And the next morning which was the 17 we marched back 
to our old camps 

And the 24 day was cool and cloudy and it was wash day 
with me. 

And the 25 which was Christmas morning was foggy but soon 
cleard off and was a pritty day but I dident have nothing to drink 
nor no young ladies to talk too so I seen but little fun 

And the 26 was a warm cloudy day and me and M. Walker 
went to the depot 

And the 27 we and Lewis Smith went back to the Depot and 
after nite I went to the show to see the Monkey. 

And the 28 day was clear and warm and Preacher Miller of 
Company C. preached for ous in the evening and his text was 
in 126 Psalms and third virse the Text was this The Lord hath 
done great things for us : Whereof we are glad : 

And the 29 day was a prity warm sunshiney day And I was 
on divishion gard at General Hoods headquarters 

And the 30 day was warm and cloudy but no rain 

And the 31 day which was the last day of 1862 was cool and 
cloudy and our Regiment had muster inspection in the day and 
at nite our Company had to go on picket gard down the bank of 
the Rapahanok River whar we was in about a hundred yards of 
the Yankees pickets they was on one side of the river and we 
was on the other we was in talken distence but our officer would 
not alow ous to talk they would cum down on the bank and 
hollow to ous and say if we would bring the boat over that they 
would come over on our side and have a talk. So that was the 
last of our works for the year 1862. 

Bartlett Y. Malone 

Co. H. 6th N. C. Regiment 



THIS IS FOR THE YEAR 1863 



The Month of January 

The first day of January was a pritty day and our Company 
was on picket down on the Rapahanock River about a mile and 
a half below Fredericksburg Va. 

And the 2 day was also a nice one 

And also the 3 was a pritty day 

And the 4 day was a pritty warm day and we all was on 
Bregaid inspection the 4th. 

And the 5 day was warm and looked like the spring of the 
year and we was all on Bregaid Drill the 5 day down on the 
old Battel field. 

And the 6 day was cloudy and raind a littel 

And the 7 day was clear and cool and we all was in General 
Revew 

And the 8 day was cloudy and cool 

And the 9 day was clear and cool and we all was on Divishion 
revew again General Hood was our revewing Officer 

And the 10 day was cloudy and raind all day long 

And the 11 was cloudy and cool 

And the 12 clay was a pritty day 

And also the 13 

And the 14 was warm and cloudy and we built a chimly to 
our tent today 

And the 15 day was warm but very winday and R. H. Wells 
started home this morning on a furlogh 

And the 16 day was a very pritty warm day and we had 
orders to cook too days rations we was expecting the Yankees 
to cross the River again but they did not 

And the 17 day was clear but very col indedd : 

And the 18 was cool 

And the 19 was warm and I was en gard 

And the 20 was cloudy and cool 

And the 21 was a very cool and raney day, 

And also the 22 day was raney and very cool. 



The Diary of Bartlett Yancey Malone 29 

And the 23 day was cloudy in the morning and cleared off 
warm about an hour befour the sun set 

And the 24 day was warm and cloudy and the old Bludy 
6th and 54 and 56 N. C. Regt was transferrd from the old 3 
bregaid which was comanded by General Law (E. M. Law) to 
the 7 Bregaid which was comanded by General Hoik (R. F. 
Hoke). 

And the 25 day was cloudy and raind a littel in the morn- 
ing about 12 olclock and we got to General Hoik (Hoke) Bre- 
gaid about 11 oclock which was 15 miles from General Lows 
(Law's) Bregaid whar we started from: 

And the 26 day was warm and cloudy 

And the 27 was a very raney day indeed 

And when I got up the morning of the 28 it was a snowing 
and it snowed all day long 

And the 29 day was clear and cool and the snow was about 
10 inches deep on the ground 

And the 30th was clear and cool 

And the 31 was pritty and Mr. Mitchel Johnston and Mr. 
John Evans arrived at our camp today on a visit. 

The Month of February 1863 

The first day of February which was the Sabath was a pritty 
spring day 

And the 2 day was cloudy and raind in the morning but 
clear and very windy in the eavning 

And the 4 day was cloudy cool and windy 

And the 5 day it Snowed in the morning and raind in the 
eavning 

And the 6 day was raney 

And the 7 clear and warm 

And the 8 day which was the Sabath was a beautyfull spring 
like day 

And the 9 was also prity and 

And the 10th day was snowing and also the 11 was 

And the 12th was a pretty warm day. 

The the 13 was clear and cool. 



30 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

And the 14th was cool and clear. 

And the 15 was warm 

And the 16 was warm and clear 

And the 17 was a snowey day and we all had to go on picket 
down at Port Royal. 

And the 18th it raind all day long and the snow nearly all 
melted of by nite and we still stade on picket 

And the 19th was cloudy but no rain and we returned to 
our Regiment 

And the 20 was warm and clear 

The 21 was warm and clear 

The 22 was a very bad day it snowed and the wind blew all 
day and at nite the snow was about a foot deep. 

And the 23 day was warm and clear but the snow dident 
melt no great deal 

And the 24 was warm and General Stokes Bregaid and 
General Lautons (Lawton?) had a snow ballen 

And the 25 was a warm sunshiney day 

And the 26 was a raney day and nearley all of the snow was 
gone by nite. 

And the 27 was warm and cloudy and our Brass Ban got 
back from Richmond. 

And the 28 which was the last day of February was coal 
and cloudy. And Mr. Portland Baley of Company D. 6th Regi- 
ment N. C. Troops was shot to death to day at 2 oclock with 
musketry. 

Now the dark days of winter is gon And the bright days of 
Spring is come. 

B. Y. Malone.. 
The Month of March. 

The first day of March was coal and raney in the morning 
and in the eavning it was clear and very windy And the 2 day 
was a beautyfull Spring day. 

And the 3 day was a beautyfull one and our Regiment left 
the old camp clost to Port Royal and marched back clost to 
Fredericksburg and taken camp again clos to the one we left 

The 16 day of March was cloudy and coal And Mr. Stons 



The Diary of Bartlett Yancey Malone 31 

in Co. F. 57 N. C. Regiment was shot to death to day with 
musketry. 

The 17th of March the Yanks crossed the Raphanock River 
at Keleys foad and our calvry whipt them back. 

And the 20 was cloudy in the morning and snowed a littel in 
the eavning and Mr. I. H. Compton arived at our camp today 
on a visit And the 21 it Snowed untell it was about 3 inches 
deep on the ground 

And the 22 the snow all melted off And Mr. Compton and 
Johnston left camp today for home. 

The last day of March the Snow was about 3 inches deep on 
the ground. 

The Month of April (May and June) 

The 4 day April was cloudy and coal in the day and after 
nite it comenced Snowing And the morning of the 5 the Snow 
was about 3 inches deep on the ground and five companys of 
our Regt had to go on picket down on the Raphanock River 

And the 6 day was clear and warm and the snow nearly all 
melted of by nite and we still staid on picket and the 7 day 
we retired to our camps. 

The 18 day which was the Sabath was a beautyfull Spring 
day and General Jackson s preacher preached in our camps and 
his text was in Hebrews 3 chapter and part of the 7 and 8 virses 
the words was this : To day if ye will hear his voice harden 
not your harts. 

The 23 day was raney and we had orders about nite to cook 
too days rations thar was sum few Yankees crossed over the 
river at Port Royal and taken a wagon or too from our men 
but they soon went back and our Regt dident have to leave the 
camp 

The 26 day of April which was the Sabath was a beautyfull 
day And I went to meating at General Jackson Headquarters 
And the Preacher taken part of the 16th chapter of Luke com- 
mencen at the 18 virse for the foundation of what remarks he 
made And in the eavning we had preachen in our Regiment 
from a preacher in the 18th Virginia Regiment. And his text 



32 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

was in Proverbs 18th chapter and the later clause of the 24th 
virse which reads thus : Ther is a friend that sticketh closter 
than a brother : 

The morning of the 28 befour I got up I herd a horse come 
threw the camp in a full lope and it was not meney minutes 
untell the man come back and sais Boys you had better get up 
we will have a fight hear to reckly and I comenced geting up 
and befour I got my close on they comenced beating the long 
roal and it was not but a minnet or too untill I herd the Adger- 
tent hollow fall in with amies the Reg : then was formed and 
marched to the Battel field the Yankies comenced crossing the 
river befour day and by day they had right smart force over 
the pickets fought sum on the 29 and a good deel of canonading 
was don and it raind sum in the eavning 

The morning of the 30th it was a railing and evry thing was 
very still untill about twelve oclock it ceased railing about ten 
o'clock they comenced cannonading and cept it up untill dark 

The first morning of May 63 our Regiment had to go in 
front on picket it was very foggy in the morning but soon got 
clear as soon as the fog was off we found the Yankees had a very 
strong line of Scirmishers in about 5 hundred yards of ours we 
cood see a great meney Yankees on the other side of the river 
but we couldent tell how meney was on this side we could hear 
very hevy canonading up the river in the eavning It is repoted 
that our men and the Yankees was a fyting at Keleys Foad : 

The 2 day of May was a very pritty day and our Regiment 
was relieved from picket about day and fell back to our brest 
works again our men fyerd on the Yankies from too Batterys 
about 10 o'clock and the Yankies returned the fyer from one 
Battery it was kept up about a hour but no damedge don as I 
have herd of we can still hear tbem a fyting at Keley's Foad 

And about 5 o'clock in the eavning we could see the Yankees 
a marchen up on the other side of the river by regiments and 
most all went back from on this Side of the river and General 
Earley thought that they was all a going back and taken all of 
his men but a Louisiana Bregaid and started to reinforce Gen- 
eral Lea And about the time we had gone 6 miles they come 



The Diary of Bartlett Yancey Malone 33 

orders that the Yankees was atvancen again whar we had left 
And then we had to turn back and march all the way back about 
10 o'clock in the nite. And the next morning which was the 3 
day our men comenced Burning (bombing) the Yankees and 
they returned the fyer and ther was right smart canonading 
and picketing don untell about 12 o'clock and then for sum cause 
we was all ordered to fall back about a half of a mile to our last 
breast works but as soon as dark come we marched about 2 miles 
up the River. 

And the next day which was the 4 we was marching about 
first from one plais to a nother a watching the Yankees untell 
about a hour by sun and the fight was opend our Bregaid went 
in and charged about a half of a mile and just befour we got 
to the Yankee Battery I was slitley wounded above the eye with 
a peas of a Bumb non was kild in our company. Lieutenant 
Walker was slitley wounded in the side. I. R. Allred was 
wounded in the arm hat to have it cut off. I. E. Calmond was 
slitley wounded in the arm. I. L. Evins had his finger shot off — 
the fift day we found the Yankees had all gon back on the other 
side of the River and we marched back down to the old camp 
ground and taken up camp again 

The 10 day of May which was the second Sunday was a very 
pretty day and I went to headquarters to preaching and the 
preachers text was in Romans the 8th chap and 28 virse the 
words was this : And we know that all things work together 
for good to them that love God. And General Jackson died to 
day which is the 10th day of May 

The 17 and 18 days was pritty and warm and our Regiment 
was on picket down on the Raphanoc and the 18th we got 
back to the camp : 

And again the 25th we had to go on picket And the 27 we 
got back about 12 oclock and in a few minuets after we got back 
we had to go on a General Revew General R. E. Lea revewed 
General Earleys Divishion. 

The last day of May we had marchen orders and after nite 
Mr. Tassett preached in our Regt his text was in St. Johns 3 
chapt & 16th virse. 



34 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

The 4th day of June about 11 Oclock in the nite we left our 
old camp clost to Fredericksburg and marched twar Culpeper 
and bout 6 O'clock the 5th day we got to Spotsylvaney Coat- 
house and about 2 o'clock in the eavning we stopt for to camp 
for the nite after marchen about 20 miles that day And the 
6th day we stade in camp untell about 2 'clock in the eavning 
for General Hils core was a fiting at Fredericksburg the Yankees 
crossed ther after they found out that we had left we marched 
about 8 miles the 6th day and it raind on ous very hard befour 
we taken up camp. 

And the 7th day we started on our march about sun up and 
about 12 o'clock we waded Rapadan River at Rackoon Foad 
and about 4 O'clock in the eavning we stopt to camp again 
in about 5 miles of Culpeper Coathouse. 

The 8th day we marched up to Culpeper and stopt to cook 
Rations The 8 day we staid at Culpeper untell about 3 'clock 
in the eavning and then we was ordered down to Brandy Sta- 
tion about 4 miles from Culpeper whar the Calvry hat bin 
fiting all day and we staid all nite and the next morning we 
found that the Yankees had all gon back on the other Side of 
the River and we marched back to Culpeper again and cooked 
another days rations and about 3 O'clock in the eavning we 
started again in the direction of AVinchester and we got as far 
as Hasel Run (Hazel Run or Deep Run) by nite And the next 
morning which was the 11th we started about sun up and 
about 9 O'clock we got to a littel town cauld Woodwin and 
whilst we was a passen threw the 6th N. C. Brass Ban plaid the 
Bonnie Blew Flag. And about eleven O'clock we got to a 
littel town cauld Sperysvill 5 miles from Woodwin And about 
2 O'clock in the eavning we past threw Washington and ther 
we found a meney pritty and kind Ladies they had water all 
along the streets for the Soldiers to drink and we dident go but 
a few miles futher untell we stopt for the nite after going about 
20 miles that day. 

And the morning of the 12th we started about sun up and 
about 3 o'clock in the eavning we crossed over the Blew Ridg 
and past threw a littel town cauld Front Royal and about a 



The Diary of Bartlett Yancey Malone 35 

mile from ther we waded the Shonadoak River and taken up 
camp on the other bank that nite. 

And the morning of the 13th we started at day and when 
we got in 12 miles of Winchester we found that the Yankees 
was at New Town on the Pike road running from Winchester to 
Strawsburg (Strasburg) 7 miles from Winchester and we turnd 
and went by ther and caught up with the Yankees about half 
way from ther to Winchester and attacked them and drove them 
back about a mile by nite 

And the next morning which was the 14th General Hooks 
(Hoke) Bregaid and General Smith and Hoses (?) all moved 
around to the west of Winchester and taken 20 peases of artil- 
lery with ous and when we got opersit the Yankees work the 
artillery taken ther position and about 3 o'clock in the eavning 
our Baterys opend on them taken them on surprise and General 
Hares ( ? ) and General Smith Bregaid charged on them and 
taken their first line of brest works befour nite And General 
Johnstons (Johnson) Divishion was a fiting them on the other 
Sid clost to town 

And the next morning which was the 15th the Yankees had 
left their works and was a trying to make thir escape toward 
Martinsburg but about day they run up on General Johnstons 
divishion about 5 miles from town wher three Regt of them was 
maid to stack thir armes and a grate meney kild and wounded 
we then marched down to whar Johnston fought them that 
morning and stopt and staid ther all day 

And the next morning about 10 o 'clock our Regt was marched 
back to Winchester for Provost gard and about a hour befour 
sun down I was sent to Taylor's Hotell with 10 men to gard the 
Yankees Prisoners And I staid ther the next day and also 
the next 

And the next morning which was the 18th I was relievd 
about 9 O'clock and started after my Regiment and about 3 
o 'clock in the eavning we got to Smithfield and by nite we got to 
a littel plais cauld Leas Town which was 22 miles from Win- 
chester and we staid ther all nite and the next morning we over- 



36 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

taken our Regiment about five miles from ther wher we staid 
all day 

And the next day we staid ther 

And the 22th we taken up a line of march again about day 
and about 7 o'clock we past threw Shepardstown and ther 
waded the Potomac and landed in Maryland about 8 oclock 
And about 3 miles from ther we past threw Sharpsburg And 
about 3 miles from ther we past threw Ketersvill And about 3 
miles from ther we past threw Boonesboro and about 3 miles 
from ther we stopt to camp. 

The 23 we left about day and when we had gon about 4 
miles we come to Beversvill and about 7 miles from ther we 
past threw Coverstown And about a mile from ther we past 
threw Smithburg whar we found a good meney Secesh And 
about 2 miles from ther we got to a littel town cauld Ringgoal 
wright war the line run between M. D. & Pa. And about 2 
miles from ther we stopt to camp and cook rations closs to 
Wainsboro. 

The morning of the 24 we left about 7 oclock and after 
marching about 5 miles we come to a town cauld Quincy And 
about 3 miles from ther we past threw Funktown and about 4 
miles from ther we got to Greenswood whar we taken up camp 
for the nite but our company had to go on gard at a town cauld 
Faytvill about 2 miles off. 

The morning of the 25th I got a Splendid breakfast in Fayt- 
ville And about 2 Oclock in the eavning we was releaved and 
went back to the Regt : 

And the next morning which was the 26th we had orders to 
leave at day break but it was a railing so hard we dident leave 
untell about 8 oclock and it dident Still sease railing but raind 
all day but we got as far as Momenburg by nite which was 14 
miles from wher we left in the morning And our Calvery taken 
a 135 prisners clost to the lettel town 

The 27 we left about 6 oclock and after marching about 6 
miles we come to a town cauld Hunterstown And about 4 miles 
from ther we got to New Chester And 3 miles from ther we 



The Diary of Bartlett Yancey Malone 37 

got to Hampton And 3 miles from ther we got to Berlin wher 
we taken camp for the nite 

The 28th we left at sun up and about 12 oclock we got to 
Yolk which was 12 miles from Berlin : 

The 29th we stade at Yolk in the Yankees Hospital. 

The 30th we left at day break and taken the same road back 
that we com And about 12 oclock we got back to Berlin again 
And when we stopt for nite we was about 20 miles from Yolk : 

The Month of July 

The first morning of July we left earley and about 12 oclock 
we got to Gatersburg (Gettysburg) which was about 10 miles 
from wher we started in the morning And when we got there 
we found the Yankies was ther And in a few minutes after 
we got ther we was ordered to the feal Our Bregaid and Gen- 
eral Haser (Hays) charged the enemy and soon got them routed 
and run them threw the town and then we stopt 

In our Company George Lyon Marshal Walker and Thomas 
Richard got kild And Sidney Hensby Anderson Plesant D. A. 
Walker Garababel Grimstead William Dunervant & Bedford 
Sawyers was wounded 

The 2 day we laid in a line of battel at the Same plais And 
the enemies picket a firing on us all day Thomas Miles kild on 
picket Shot in the head And about Sun down our Bregaid and 
Hoser was ordered to charge just in frund and take the enemes 
Batterys we charged and succeeded in driven the Infantry from 
behind two stone fences and got part of the Batterys But it 
was soon so dark and so much smoke that we couldent see what 
we was a doing And the enemy got to geather again and we 
had no reinforcement and we had to fall back to our old posi- 
tion Colonel I. E. Avry (Avery) was kild in the charge in our 
company non kild Andrew Thompson Franklin Wells and R. 
Y. Vaughn was wounded And Michagels Miles misen 

The 3 morning we went back in town and laid in a line of 
battel all day in the Streets And ther was a great deel of flting 
don that day but our Divishion was not cauld on 



38 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

The nex morning about a hour befour day we went back 
about a mile from town and staid ther all day 

The morning of the 5 we left befour day and it a raining as 
hard as it could poor and marched in the direction of Hagerds- 
town and didnt get but about 6 miles all day for the Yanks 
calvry kep a running up on ous all day 

And the 6th we left at day and about 2 oclock we got to 
Wainsboro and we past threw town and then stopt to cook 
rations 

The 7th we taken the road to Hagerdstown which was 10 
miles from Wainsboro And about 2 oclock in the eavning we 
got ther and taken up camp 

The 8th day it raind very hard and we still stade at the 
same plais the 8 we staid ther and the 10 we staid at the same 
place until about a hour by sun And then started and past 
threw town and went about a mile toward Williamsport and 
stopt and staid all nite 

The 11th we taken our position in a peas of woods and after 
nite built brest works 

The 12th we staid behind our works and no fiting don except 
sum picketing And after nite we was ordered to the wright 
And was marched down in rear of A. P. Hills old Divishion 

The 13th we staid ther untill dark and then started to re- 
treet back across the Potomac And it was about 6 miles to the 
river and it was a raning very hard And we was a moving all 
nite and the next morning about sun up we waded the Potomac 
at Williamsport and it was waist deep And then we marched 
about 6 miles and stopt to cook rations 

The 15th we marched about 7 miles and stopt at nite clost 
to Martinsburg And the 16th we marched up to Darksvill and 
stopt again And we still staid at Darksvill untell about a hour 
by sun and marched to the Alagater mountain by 10 Oclock in 
the nite : 

The 21 we left at day break and crost the mountain And 
marched as far as Hedgersvill by 2 Oclock in the eavning which 
was 25 miles we expected to bag the Yankees at plais but when 
we got ther they was all gon ; 



The Diary of Bartlett Yancey Malone 39 

The 22th we left Hedgersvill and marched back to Bunker- 
hill whitch was 18 miles. 

The 23 we marched and about 10 oclock we marched threw 
Winchester and taken the road to Culpeper and marched about 

5 miles and stopt for the nite : 

The 24th we marched near the Shanadoah River and found 
that the Yankees had got possession of the gap in the Blew 
Ridg 

And then we taken the write and come in to the Winchester 
and Stanton Road at Middeltown 5 miles from Strawsburg and 
we stopt at nite clost to Strawsburg which was 23 miles from 
wher we started at in the morning 

The 25th we marched all day toward Stanton and travild 
about 18 miles and stopt clost to Edensburg : 

The 26th we past threw Hawkenstown and 2 miles from ther 
we come to Mount Jackson and we marched as far as New 
Market and stopt fer the nite 

The 27th we left the Stanton road and taken a road that led 
to Gordensvill : we crost over the Shanadoah mountian and crost 
the Shanadoah river on Pontoon Bridges and when we stopt at 
nite we was at the foot of the Blew Ridg which was 18 miles from 
Newmarket 

The 28th we crost over the Blew Ridg which was 14 miles 
across it 

The 29th we marched up to Maderson coathouse whitch was 

6 miles and stopt and taken up camp 

The 30 we staid at the same plais 

The 31st we left at one Oclock and marched down between 
Culpeper and Gordensvill 

A list of Co. H. 
Sargants. 



1 Johnston I. H. 


4 Hester N. W. 


2 Rudd A. P. 


5 Malone B. Y. 


3 Bauldin W. H. 






Corporel 


1 Murrie W. W. 


3 Walker M. H. 


2 Biele C. 


4 Tompson A. J, 



40 



James Sprunt Historical Publications 





Privat 




1 Aldridg I. H. 


35 


Miles J. S. 


2 Anderson Q. T. 


36 


Moore A. 


3 Aired J. B. 


37 


Malone H. 


4 Bivins M 


38 


Murrey T 


5 Brincefield A. J. 


39 


Mckinnie Murphy B. P 


6 Brankin I 


40 


Mosey J. W. 


7 Boswell T 


41 


Oliver J. S. 


8 Cooper W. H. 


42 


Olver T 


9 Coving-ton I. E. 


43 


Plesant A. M. 


10 Compton I. B. 


44 


Page F. 


11 Colmond J. E. 


45 


Roberson J. 


12 Cape T. H. 


46 


Rudd E. 


13 Chatham C 


47 


Richmond W. 


14 Donoho S. 


48 


Richmond T. 


15 Dunervant I. 


49 


Rigan N. 


16 Dunervant W. 


50 


Simpson F. 


17 Evins T. H. 


51 


Swift R. 


18 Enoch R. H. 


52 


Smith L. 


19 Fauller I 


53 


Swift H. A. 


20 Fitch G. S. 


54 


Stadler G. 


21 Grimsteard G. 


55 


Subfield R, 


22 Hensley S 


56 


Snips J. C. 


23 Hensley A 


57 


Tucker A. 


24 Huges W. A. 


58 


Vaughn R. Y. 


25 Hooper N 


59 


Williams J. W. 


26 Johnston I. H. 


60 


Williams J. R. 


27 Kersey L. 


61 Walker John 


28 King S 


62 


Walker W. S. 


29 Lyon G. 


63 


Walker J. H. 


30 Lyon I. H. 


64 Walker D. A. 


31 Loyd I. W. 


65 Walker W. T. 


32 Lewis C. 


66 Wells M. 


33 Miles M. 


67 Wells W. F. 


34 Miles T. C. 


68 


Wren W. 



The Diary of Bartlett Yancey Malone 41 

Bartlett Y. Malones, Book 
This the 19th of Nov. 1863 

Bartlett. Y. Malones Book 
This is the 18th of Dec. 1863 

Bartlett. Y. Malone Seg't. of Co: H. 

6th N. C. Regiment 

This the 22d of Dec. 1863 

And we staid in camp clost to Rappidan Station untell the 
14th of Sept. 63. And the morning of the 14th we was rousted 
up and gave orders to cook one days rations. And about sun 
up we started to meat our enemy and we met them at Sumers- 
vill foad on the Rappidan River which was about 5 miles from 
our old camps. We had not bin there long untell our enemy 
comenced throwing bumbs amung us but as soon as our Bat- 
terys got position and fired a few shots the yanks all left the 
field. And the 15th we laid in the woods all day. No fiting 
don but some canonading and picketing but at dark our Reg't 
went on picket down at the foad. The 16th as soon as lite our 
men comenced firing at the Yanks and they at us and kept it 
up all day about 10 o'clock in the day Capt. Pray of Co. D & 
Lieut Brown of Co. E and 18 men voluntierd and went up the 
river and crost in a littel Boat and Slipt up to some old houses 
and fierd at the Yanks & run about 200 of them out of their 
works and captured a horse severl good Guns Blankets another 
trick and then crost back and never got a man hirt. They kild 
4 or 5 of the Yanks & wounded 4 which they taken prisners. 
We got 4 wounded in our Reg't. dewing the day. At nite we 
was relieved by the 57th N. C. Reg't. The 17th no fiting don 
except a few picket shots evry now an then at the foad. 

Evry thing was quiet then untell the 5th day of Oct. 63. 
And the 5th day of Oct. about tenn Oclock we was ordered to 
fall in at a moment and then marched to our post and taken 
our position in a line of battel. And we remaind so untell nite 
and then was marched back to our camps again. The Yanks 



42 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

could be seen mooving about from a hight on our side of the 
river. Our Generals surposed that they was agoing to make 
an efert to cross. But they did not : they was onley moving 
camps: All was quiert then untell the 8th. The 8th day we 
left our camps about dark and marched about 2 miles and stopt 
and staid all nite. The 9th day we marched up to Orange C. H. 
by 12 o'clock: then taken the road to Maderson C. H. (Madison) 
marched 6 or 7 miles and stop for nite again. 

The 10th we got to Maderson by 4 o 'clock in the eavning and 
crost Roberson River at 3 and then marched about 4 miles futher 
toward Culpeper and stopt for nite our Cavalry had a littel fite 
in the eavning at the River taken about one hundred prisners. 
The 11th we marched toward Culpeper and got in 6 miles and 
stopt and cooked 3 days rations, it was 20 miles from Maderson 
C. H. to Culpeper C. H. 

The 12th we had orders to leave at 2 o 'clock : A. M. but did 
not leave untell day we marched on then untell we was in 2 
miles of Culpeper. And then taken the left and came in the 
Warrenton road at Pickersvill And there we waded Haselrun 
and marched on to the Rappahannock River and campt clost to 
Warrenton Spring. The 13th we marched up to Warrenton 
and stopt and cooked 2 days rations : The 14th we left for 
Bristol but had to drive our enemey befour us our Cavalry was 
fiting them allday and some times the Infantry, our Divishion 
don a great deal of hard marchen had to dubbelquick nearly 
one third of our time. A. P. Hill Corps overtaken the Yanks 
at Bristol Station and had a littel fite : we did not get ther in 
time to be ingaged 

The 15th the Yanks had all fell back to Sentervill (Center- 
ville) we did not go eney further our Cavalry folerd them and 
taken severl Prisners. 

The 16th we tore up the Railroad 

The 17th we staid in camp clost to Bristol Station. 

The 18th we left at 3 o'clock in the nite for Rappahannock 
and got as far as Beattoe Station by nite. 

The 18th we marched to the Rappahannock and crost and 
went in camps between the river and Brandy Station 



The Diary of Bartlett Yancey Malone 43 

The 28th our Reg't went on picket on the Rappahannock 
The 29th we was relieved 
The 30th we had bregaid drill 
The 31st had muster inspection 

The Month of November (and December) 

The 5th day of Nov. General Lea & Governer Letcher of Va. 
revewed General Stuart Cavalry clost to our camps 

The 6th we was paid off And paid up to the first day of 
November, 1863. 

The 7th about 2 o 'clock in the eavning orders came to fall in 
with armes in a moment that the enemy was atvancen. Then 
we was doubbelquicked down to the river (which was about 5 
miles) and crost and formed a line of battel in our works and 
the yanks was playing on ous with thir Artillery & thir skir- 
mishers a fyring into ous as we formed fyring was kept up 
then with the Skirmishers untell dark. And about dark the 
yanks charged on the Louisianna Bregaid which was clost to 
the Bridg and broke thir lines and got to the Bridge we was 
then cutoff and had to Surender: was then taken back to the 
rear and staid thir untell next morning The morning of the 8th 
we was marched back to Warrenton Junction and got on the 
cars and about day next morning we got to Washington we 
then staid in "Washington untel 3 o'clock in the eavning of the 
8th then was marched down to the Warf and put on the Sterner 
John Brooks and got to Point Lookout about one 'clock on the 
eavning of the 10th day of November 1863. The names of the 
men that was taken prisner when I was belonging to Co. H. was 
Capt. Lea Lieut. Hill W. H. Bowldin N. W. Hester W. W. 
Murrie C. Rile H. Malone I. R. Aldridge L. T. Anderson A. I. 
Brincefield I. E. Covington T. Y. Compton I. C. Chatham T. H. 
Evans G. R. Grimstead W. A. Hughs N. Hooper H. Kersey 
A. More W. D. Richmond P. Simpson R. Swift L. Sawers H. 
Roscoe A. Tucker John Walker W. S. Walker W. P. Wells 1. 
Wren S. Hensley And Segt. A. P. Rudd 

Our rations at Point Lookout was 5 crackers and a cup of 
coffee for Breakfast. And for dinner a small ration of meat 2 



44 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

crackers three Potatoes and a cup of Soup. Supper we have non. 
We pay a dollar for 8 crackers or a chew of tobacco for a 
cracker. 

A Yankey shot one of our men the other day wounded him 
in the head shot him for peepen threw the cracks of the planken 

The last day of November was very coal indeed and the 
Yanks had inspection of ous Rebels. One of the Yankee Sen- 
tinerls shot one of our men the other morning he was shot in 
the head : soon died. 

All the wood we get to burn at Point Lookout is one sholder 
tirn of pine brush every other day for a tent 16 men to every 
tent 

The 16th of Dec. 63 a Yankey Captain shot his Pistel among 
our men and wounded 5 of them; sence one has died — he shot 
them for crowding arond the gate. The captain 's name that shot 
was Sids. Him and Captain Patison and Segt. Finegan was 
the 3 boss men of the prisoners camp. 

The 24th of Dec. 63 was a clear day but very cool. And 
Generl Butler the Yankey beast revewed the prisners camp : 

The 25th was Christmas day and it was clear and cool and I 
was boath coal and hungry all day onley got a peace of Bread 
and a cup of coffee for Breakfast and a small Slice of Meat 
and a cup of Soup and five Crackers for Dinner and Supper 
I had non : 

The 26th was clear and cool and dull for Christmas 

The 28th was cloudy and rained a littel The 28th was a 
raney day. 

The 29th was cloudy in the morning and clear in the eav- 
ning. And Jeferson Walker died in the morning he belonged 
to the 57th N. C. Regt. The 30th was a beautyfull day. 

The 31st which was the last day of 63 was a raney day. 
And maby I will never live to see the last day of 64. And 
thairfour I will try and do better than I have. For what is a 
man profited if he shal gain the whole world and loose his 
one Soul : Or what Shal one give in exchange for his Soul : 

B. Y. Malone. 



B. Y. MALONE'S BOOK 

FOR THE YEAR 1864 



I spent the first day of January 64 at Point Lookout M. D. 
The morning was plesant but toward eavning the air changed 
and the nite was very coal, was so coal that five of our men 
froze to death befour morning. We all suffered a great deal 
with coal and hunger too of our men was so hungry to day that 
they caught a Rat and cooked him and eat it. Thir names was 
Sergt. N. W. Hester & I. C. Covington. 

The 6th was coal and cloudy and we had 9 men to die at the 
Hospital to day. Our beds at this plaice is composed of Sea 
feathers that is we geather the small stones from the Bay and 
lye on them 

The 7th was very cool a small Snow fell after nite 

The 10 was a nice day and I saw the man to day that makes 
Coffens at this plaice for the Rebels and he sais that 12 men 
dies here every day that is averidgs 12 

The Commander at this point is named Marsto 

The 22th day of January 64 was a very pritty day And it 
was my birth day which maid me 25 years of age I spent the 
day at Point Lookout. M. D. And I feasted on Crackers and 
Coffee The two last weeks of January was beautyfull weather 

The Month of February. 64 The first day of February was 
warm but cloudy and Sum rain : 

Be content with such things as you have : For he hath said 
I will never leave the nor forsake thee So we may boldly say 
the Lord is my helper and I will not fear what man shall do 
unto me 

There fell a Small Snow the morning of the third Sergt. 
A. P. Rudd & Gidney King arived at Point Lookout from 
Washington the 4th. We changed Cook houses on the 7th 
of Feb. 

The 14th of Feb was a pritty day And the Yankes Sirched 
the Prison Camp the Rebels was all sent out side under gard. 



46 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

And then they sirched and taken evry mans Blanket that had 
more then one. And taken evry other little trick that the 
Rebels had. They found too Boats that the Rebs had maid. 

375 Officers arived at Point Lookout from Jonstan Isle the 
14th of Feb. The Yankey papers say that they are having a 
Gun maid that weighs 115,000 lbs. 21 ft. long carries a Ball that 
weighs 1000 Lbs and a shell that weighs 700 lbs. 

The 17th it was so coal that we all had to lye down and rap 
up in our Blankets to keep from freazing for we had no wood 
to make us a fire. 

The 18th it was so coal that a mans breath would freaze on 
his beard going from the Tent to the Cookhouse. O, it was so 
coal the 18th 

The 20th was pleasant and General Butler the Beast re- 
vewed the Prison Camp again for the Second time 

The 24th was a beautyfull day And too of the Rebs got 
kild the nite of the 24th attempting to get away : We was 
garded at Point Lookout by the second fifth and twelfth New- 
hampshire Regiments untell the 25th of Feb : And then the 
26th N. C. Negro Regiment was plaised gard over ous 

A Yankey preacher preached to the Rebels the 26th day of 
Feb : 1864 : His text was in first Corinthian 16 chap and 22th 
virse The words was this : If any man love not the Lord Jesus 
Christ let him be Anathema Maren athas That is let him be 
acursed when the Lord shal come 

The Month of March 

The first day of March was coal and raney : And our Com- 
pany was examined on the Oath question evry man was taken 
in the House one at a time and examioned : the questions asked 
me was this : Do you wish to take the Oath and join the U. S. 
Armey or Navey : or work at govenment work or on Brestworks 
or Do you wish to take a Parole and go to your home if it be 
insied of our lines or do you wish to go South I told him I 
wished to go South : He then asked me my name County 
State Company & Regiment The 2d two thousen Rebels left 
Point Lookout M. D. for Dixie : 



The Diary of Bartlett Yancey Malone 47 

The 3d I met with The good luck of geting sum Cloathing 
from Dixie : 600 Rebels left for Dixie again the 9th. 

Another boat load of Rebels left Point Lookout the 16th 
for Dixie. 

250 Officers arived at Point Lookout the 20th 

One of our Rebel officers maid me a present of a dollar in 
greenback (the 21st) he stuch it threw the crack of the planken 
to me without being asked 

The 20h of March a Yankey Sergt : named Young shot one 
of our Officers for jawing him : 

The 22d was very coal and stormey and a while befour 
nite it comenced snowing and snowed all nite : the snow would 
avridge 3 inches deep the next morning : 

The 25th I went to the cookhouse for a cook : 

The Month of April 

The first day of April was a very nice day. 

The 5th was a very bad day it raind hard snowed and the 
wind blew the Bay was so high that it overflowed part of the 
Camp. Some men had to leave thir tents and moove up to the 
Cook house : There was some men in camp who had been going 
about of nits and cuting tents and sliping mens Knapsacks Hats 
Boots and Sumetimes, would get Some money They cut into 
ours and got money and cloathen all amounting to about one 
hundred dollars : One nite the Negros was on gard and caught 
them they was then plaised under gard and made ware a Barrel 
Shirt (and marched) up and down the Streets with large let- 
ters on them the letters was this Tent Cutters 

The 12th the 3d Maryland Negro Regiment was plaisd on 
gard around the Prison Camp : When the Negrows first come 
on gard they wore thir knapsacks and when they was put on 
poast they puled them off and laid them down at the end of 
thir lines And Some of our men stole too of them : And when 
the Negro found it was gone he sais to the next one on post 
Efrum- Efrum : tell that other Negro w up dar that the white 
folks has stold my knapsack a redy : The other one sais they 
have stold mine too but I want caring for the knapsack all I 



48 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

hate about it is loosing Sophys Garotipe (daguerreotype?) One 
day too of them was on poast in the Streets and met up at the 
end of thir lines and comenced fooling with thir Guns what 
they cauld plaing bayonets they had thir guns cocked preseantly 
one of thir guns went of and shot the other one threw the brest 
he fell dead : the other one sais : Jim, Jim get up from dar you 
are not hurt your just trying to fool me : 

The nite of the 18th a negrow Senternel shot one of our 
men wounded him very bad threw the sholdier 

The nite of the 21st a Negro shot in a tent wounded two of 
our men 

The 27th a load of Sick Rebels left Point Lookout M. D. for 
Dixie. 

The 29th a nother Neagro kild him Self. Shot him Self in 
the mouth with his gun : 

The Month of May 64 

The 3d day of May 6 hundred Rebels left this plaice for 
Dixie 

The 13th about one hundred prisnors was brought to this 
plaice they was capturd clost to Petersburg Va. 

The 15th 40 prisnors arived at this point captured between 
Richmond and Petersburg by Gen. Butlers armey 

The 17th about one thousin Prisnors arived at this plaice 
was captured at the wilderness The 17th about 1000 was 
brought in from General Leas armey 

The 18th four hundred more was brought in the camp 

The 24th a Neagro Senternal Shot a mung our men kild one 
and wounded three it is thought that one of the wounded will 
die : 

The 28 four hundred more prisnors arived here "We have 
Pork and Been Soop to day for dinner Will have beef and 
Coffee to morrow I believe I will go down in Camp, but the 
sun is very hot 

The Month of June 1864 

The first day of June was clear and hot 



The Diary of Bartlett Yancey Malone 49 

The 4th We had Beef and Potato Soop for dinner the Yanks 
are not a going to give us no more Coffee and Sugar from this on 

The 8th 6 hundred Prisnors arived at this point from Gen- 
eral Leas Armey 

The 10th we have Old Bacon to day for dinner for the first 
time sience we have bin at P.t. Lookout 

The 11th 500 more prisnors arived here. 

The 18th of June which was three years from the time I vol- 
untierd was cloudy and cool. And we had Pork and Hominy 
for dinner There is some talk of moving the Prisnors from this 
point it is getting to be very sickley here 11 men died at the 
Hospital yestiday it is said that the water is not healthy 

It is reported that General Grant and General Lea are fiting 
on the South of the James River 

From the 20th of June untell the last was very dry and dusty 
And we would hear good news evry now and then from our 
Armey Our Rations Still remain Small 

July the 1st 1864 

The first day of July 1861 I left home And the first day of 
July 1862 I was in the fight of Malvin Hill And the first day 
of July 1863 I was in the fight at Gettersburg And today whitch 
is the first day of July 1864 I am at Point Lookout M. d. It is 
very plesant to day We had pical Pork for breakfast this morn- 
ing and for dinner we will have Been Soop 

The 4th day of July was a beautyfull day And the Yanks 
had thir Vesels riged off with flags they had about 34 flags on 
each Gun Boat about 12 O'clock they fierd Saluts boath from 
thir land Batry and Gun Boats. 

The 13th day of July 13 of our men died at the Hospital 
And it was repoted that General Ewel was a fiting at Washing- 
ton And that our Cavalry was in 4 miles of this plaice the 
Yanks was hurried up sent in all Detailes at 2 O'clock in the 
eavning and run thir Artilry out in frunt of the Block house 
and plaised it in position The 14th 500 Rebels taken the Oath 
and went outside 

The last day of July was the Sabath 



50 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

No man is bornd without folts 

Too much of one thing is good for nothin 

Cut your Coat accorden to your cloth 

All are not Sants who go to Church 

All are not theavs that dogs bark at 

Keep your mouth shut and your eyes open 

A clean glove often hids a dirty hand 

Seay what is well and do what is better 

He that will steal a pin will steal a better thing 

Fear no man and do justice to all men 

Evry Cook praises his own stew 

Before thou marry be sure of a house wherein to tarry 

Evry bodys business is no body's business 

Do what you ought come what may 

Love cover meney folts. 

The race is not always to the swift nor the battel to the strong 

You cannot catch old birds with chaff. 

A bad workman quarrels with his tools 

B. Y. Malone 
B. Y. Malone Owes cts 
Q. T. Anderson Paid 
A. P. Rudd Paid 

T. Y. Compton Paid 
Sergt W. T. Johnson 
Sergt. Laffoan 
Samuel Mothers head 
George Anthony 

A Puzzel 
There is a thing in divers of countrys 
It neither is land nor Sea 
It in all sorts of timber 
And not in eny tree 
It is neither in Italy 
But in Rome 

It appears twist in evry moment 
And not once in twenty years 



The Diary of Bartlett Yancey Malone 51 



Dew B. Y. Malone 




Thomas Murray 


$1.00 


John Forast 


$1.00 


W. A. Hughs 


$1.00 


E. W. Rudd 


$1.00 


N. W. Hester Paid 


$5.00 


W. R. Richmond Paid 


$5.00 


T. Y. Compton Paid 


$5.00 


W. F. Wells Paid 


$5.00 


A. I. Brinefield Paid 


$5.00 


L. Kersey Paid 


$5.00 


B. Y. Malone Owes 




Q. T. Anderson Paid 


$6.50 


A. P. Rudd Paid 


$5.00 



Bartlett Y. Malone, Soldier of Co. H. 6th N. C. Regiment. 

This April the 16th 64 
Point Lookout, M. D. 

O, that mine eyes might closed be 
To what becomes me not to see 
That deafness might possess mine ear 
To what concerns me not to hear. 

Mr. Demill & Co., 

No. 186 Front Street 
New York City, 

N. Y. 
B. Y. Malones Chirography. 

The Month of August 1864 

The first day of August was clear and very hot And 700 
Rebels left here for Some other new Prison to day A mung them 
was my Brother A. A. 

The 2d day of August I wrote home 

The 6th of the month there rose a thunder cloud early in the 



52 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

morning and raind very hard : there was a whirlwind just out sid 
of the Prison on the point it blew the Comasary house and Shop 
down and seven other Buildings it distroyed a good deal wounded 
four senternels broak ones leg There was but littel wind inside 
of the Prison 

The knight of the 7th A Neagro Senternel Shot one of our 
men and kild him for no cause attall 

The 28th of August a Senternel shot a nother one of our men 
wounded him very badly it is thought that he will die 

The two last days of August cool and plesant 

The Month of September 

The firs days of September was plesant the Knights was cool 
but the days was plesant 

The 2d day this is And our Rations gets no better we get 
half a loaf of Bread a day a smal slice of Pork or Beef or Sault 
Beef for Breakfast for Dinner a cup of Been Soup and Supper 
we get non Mr. A. Morgan of South Carolina has a vacon Cook 
House which he has bin teaching School in evry Sience last 
Spring he is a Christian man he preaches evry Sunday and has 
prayers evry morning befour School we have a Preacher to evry 
Division in the Camp Mr. Carrol preaches to our Divi which 
is the 8th This is the 5th day of the month and we are going to 
have Been Soup with onions in it to day for dinner we will have 
Potatoes and Onions boath to morrow the Dr had them sent in 
here for rebs to se if they would not stop Scirvy My health is 
very good to day which is the 6th of Sept. 64. But I cannot tell 
how long it will remain so. for it a railing and very coal to day 
Aand I have not got eney Shoes 

This is the 7th and a pritty day it is and I am laying flat on 
my back on T. Y. Comptons Bead in Co. G 8th Division Point 
Lookout M. D. 

The 8th was a beautyfull day And I had my Bunk Seting 
out by the Side of the Cook house and about dark I wanted to 
bring it in as I had bin doing but the Neagro Sentinel would not 
let me cross his line So I went down threw the house and asked 
a nother one if I could cross his line and get my Bunk and he 



The Diary of Bartlett Yancey M alone 53 

Said yes so I cross and got my Bunk and the first Neagro did 
not see me. And when he found that the Bunk was gone he come 
to the house door and wanted to know where that man was that 
taken that Bunk And if he dident bring it back that he would 
come in there and Shoot him So then I had to go to the dor and 
he told me to bring that Bead back So I taken it back and could 
not get it any more untell I went and got the Lieut, of the 
Comisery to get it for me So you See this is the way we was 
treated by the Neagrows. B. Y. M. 

The 15th of Sept was a beautyfull day And a general Stir 
among the Rebs the Dr. was getting up a load of Convalesant men 
to Send to Dixie. You could See men going to the Hospital to be 
examiond Some on Cruches and Some was not able to walk and 
would be Swinging a round others necks draging a long 

They got a load of five hundred and Sent them out of the 
Prison we Surpose they will leave the 15th for Dixie The 19th 
received a Box of tobacco from my Father James B. Malone who 
resides in Caswell County North Carolina The 21st all Prisnors 
belonging to the Confederate Staits Navy was Parold at this 
place. 

This Sunday the 25th of September and it is very coal 
I wrote home to day 

The 26th 800 Prisnors arived at this point belonging to 
Erleys (Early) Comand captured clost to Winchester The 
knight of 26th Some one stold 5.45 in greenback from me 

The 27th 500 more Prisnors arived here from the same 
Comand 

The 28th the Yanks brought in three Negrows that they 
caught helping a Lady across the Potomac Some where be- 
tween here and Washington they brought them here and put 
them in Prison because they would not take the oath 

The 30th I wrote to Bro. James 

October 1864 

The first day of October was cold and raney day The 3d 
800 Prisnors arived here from Early's command captured at 
Fishers Hill Va. among them was James M Wells of Co H 6th 
N. C. Regt 



54 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

The 4th 100 more Prisnors com in Ther is about 10,000 Pris- 
nors here at this time last Summer ther was 15,000 here but 
Some was sent to Elmira N. Y. 

The 7th was fasting and prayer day with ous for the reliece 
of all Prisnors 

Today is the 8th and is very cold 

The 13th was very cool And in the eavning 200 Rebs taken 
the Oath 

The 15th I Sold the last of my Tobacco the Box brought 
me fifty five dollars and 70 cts 

To day is the 16th And a beautyfull Sabath it is : the Boys 
in camp are all in a line wating to be inspected by Major A. G. 
Brady Provost Marshall 

To day is the 18th and Secretary Stanton has just past 
threw the Camp. 

The 21st 200 Rebels arived here from the Valey captured 
Severl days ago. 

The 24th they parold Severl Sick men Said to be 2000 to 
leave in a few days. 

The 25th Some more prisnors come in from the Valey Said 
that 900 was capturd when they was 

The 29th About 80 Rebs arived here they was capturd clost 
Petersburg Old Butler kept them at work on a Pond 8 days 
under the fire of our guns. 

The 31st 600 more Rebs arived here capturd clost to Peters- 
burg 

November 1864 

The first of November was pritty w.eather. 

The 7th whitch was just twelve months from the time I was 
captured was a raney day. 

The 8th was election day for president Abraham Lincoln & 
George B. McClellan was candidates 

The 9th was warm and cloudy and our Rations ar not a 
good as they was a year ago : And I See no chance for march- 
ing Soon. 

B. Y. Malone. 



The Diary of Bartlett Yancey Malone 55 

The 18th of Nov. was a cold raney day Our men are not 
dying here like they have bin they onley avridge about too a 
day now The last of Nov. was pritty warm weather 

December 1864 

The first day of Dec was warm as Spring And the Yanks 
comenced building some littel plank houses covered with clouth 
for the Rebs to stay in 

The 3d I paid 10 cets to go into a Concert that the Rebs had 
got up in camp it was a very good thing they performed in a 
bacon Cook-house. 

The 4th which was the Sabath I went to meating at the 
School house Mr. Morgan lectured on the Parable of the Sower 
& in the eavning I was at the Same plaise and Mr. Carol preached 
a good Surmond from the later clause of the 2 virse 7 chapter 
of Amos : Theas was the words : By whom Shall Jacob arise : 
for he is small. After preaching was over the Sunday School 
classes met and thir teachers taken up the balance of the day in 
asking them questions and explaning the Scriptures to them 
We have white gard now for patroles in camp of knights the 
Neagros got so mean that the General would not alow them in 
Side of the Prison they got so when they would catch any of 
the men out Side of thir tents after taps they would make them 
doubble quick or jump on thir backs and ride them and some 
times they would make them get down on this knees and prey to 
God that they might have thir freadom and that his Soul might 
be sent to hell 

To day is the 15th and it is cold looks very mutch like Snow 
we have had very coald weather for the last week we get Split 
Peas now to make Soups. Some day we get Bacon and some 
days Picle Pork and fresh Beef once a week 

My health is very good at this time I weigh 155 lbs We 
have comenced drawing wood we get two smawl shoulder turns a 
day to a Company Each Company has 100 men 

The 21st was a very cold raney day Brigadeer General Barnes 
in comand of the Point A. G. Brady is Provost Marchall Capt 
Barnes assistant Prov. 



56 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

The 24th was a beautyfull day I chopt wood in the morning 
at the cookhouse in the eavning I bought 3 apples and set in the 
Sun Shine by the Side of Sergt. A. P. Rudd tent & eat them. 
And then my Self Q. T. Anderson W. W. Murrie & W. F. Wells 
went up to the School house to a Debate but did not get in And 
then we went back to the Tent and found T. Y. Compton with a 
newspaper that he had bought and we spent the remainder of 
the day in reading it. 

The 25th was Christmas day And a beautyfull one it was. 
But I had nothing Strong to drink and but little to eat I had 
Some loaf Bread fryed Meat & Corn Coffee for breakfast and 
for dinner I had a cup of Split Pea Soup. 

In the eavning I went to the School house to meating Mr. 
Carrol preached his text was in Zachariah 15th chapt 7 virse 
After preaching I went to the Comisery and found that Mr. 
Walas had bet Mr. Barby five dollars that there was a man in 
Camp that could eat 5 lbs of Bacon and 3 Loafs of Bread each 
loaf weighing 2 lbs at one meal. When I left he had onley about 
14 of a pound of Bacon and a half of a loaf of bread they Said 
he eat it all befour he quit. This man belonged to the 11th Ala : 
Regiment 

The 26th was a raney day 

The 27 & 28 was cloudy 

The 29th was cold and cloudy & Snowed a little in the Eav- 
ning 

The 30th was cold 

The 31st was very cold and Snowed a littel evry now & then 
threw the day. 



BARTLETT Y. MALONE'S BOOK 

FOR THE YEAR 1865 



The Month of January 

The first day of January was very cold & the grown was 
coverd with Snow : 

The 2d was cold and cloudy 

The 3d it snowed a littel in the eavning 

The 4th was very cold and the Snow was 3 inches deep 

The 5th was warm and cloudy 

The 6th my Self A. R. Moore James R. Aldridg Nathaniel 
Hooper & T. Y. Compton built us a hous out of cracker Boxes 
the house coust us $8.80 cts we bought a stove from the Sutlar 
the Stove coust us $8.00 the Stove and house totel $16.80. 

The 15th was a beautyful Sabath & I went to meating & 
Mr. Newman preached from Psalms 8 ch. 4th Virse 

The 17th it Snowed in the morning And about one thousen 
old men & littel Boys left for Dixie. 

The 21st it rained and Sleated all day & a large Dixie mail 
came in one hudred & Sixty dollars worth of Due Letters : 

The 22d was cold and cloudy & it was my birthday whitch 
made me 26 years old. And about 600 prysnors come in to day 
captured at Foat Fisher The men that came in Say that Gen- 
eral Whiten & Colonel Lamb was captured and also wounded 
After knight a Neagrow Sentnal Shot one of our men and 
kild him. 

The 23d a large Dixie mail come in I got 2 letters from home 
& one from Bro. Jim. 

The 28th was clear but the coldest day we have had this 
winter there was a man froze to death in the 5th Division after 
knight. 

The 29th was the Sabath I went to meating with Mr. Athy 
preached 

The 30th & 31st was pritty warm days. 



58 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

February 1865 

The first of Feb. was warm And 500 Rebels come in cap- 
tured clost Atlanta Ga. 

The 4th all men belonging to Kentuckey Missouri Louisina 
Tennasee & Arkansas was cauld to go to Dixie. 

They Still cauld on the 5 & 6th. 

The 17th all prisnors captured at Gettersburg was cauld out. 

The 18th the Gettersburg Prisnors left for Dixie. 

The 21st all Prisnor capturd at Rappahanoc Station was 
cauld we all went out and Signed the Parole and was put in 
the Parole Camp and staid there most all the 24th then we was 
put on the Steamer George Leary we got to Fortress Monroe 
about dark And then run as far as Hampton Roads and there 
we staid all night Started next morning at light which was 
the 25 got to Acorns Landing about 10 Oclock which was about 
12 miles from Richmond on the James River we then marched 
from there to Camp Lea we got to Camp Lea about dark We 
then Staid at Camp Lea untell the 27 when we wen over to 
Camp Winder. 

March 1865 

The 2 day of March I got my Furlough the 3 they paid me 
12 months wages which was 237.00. 

Went down to Richmond got on the cars about 6 O'clock in 
the Eavning 

The 4th I got to Barksdale Depot about 10 in the morning, 
got off at Barksdale marched to the Road house by dark Eat 
Supper with Mr. Hanrick marched on 2 miles further and Staid 
all night with Mr. Moss. Left early next morning which was the 
5th eat Breakfast at Mr. Maxtons got home about 1 O'clock in 
the Eavning. B. Y. Malone. 

B. Y. Malone was borned in the year of our Lord 1838 rased 
and graduated in the Corn field & Tobacco And inlisted in the 
war June the 18th 1861 And was a member of the Caswell Boys 
which was comanded by Capt Mitchel And 25 was attatched 
to. the 6th N. C. Regt. which was comd by Coin Fisher who got 
kiled at the first Manassas fight which was fought July the 21st 



The Diary of Bartlett Yancey Malone 59 

1861. They was comanded by W. D. Pender mitell the Seven 
Pine fight which was fought the 30th day of May 62 Col. Pender 
then was promoted to Brigadier General Then Capt. I. E. 
Avry of Co. E. was promoted to Lieut Colonel who comanded 
untell the Battel of Gettysburg where he was kild which fought 
the 2d day of July 1865. 

Major R. F. Webb was then promoted to Col. who comanded 
untell we was done at the Rapahanock Bridg the 7th of Nov. 
1863. Our Regt when was captured belonged to General Hooks 
Brigard Earlys Division Ewels Corps Leas Armey. 

B. Y. Malone. 



THE PROVINCIAL AGENTS OF 
NORTH CAROLINA 

BY 
SAMUEL JAMES ERVIN, JR. 



THE PROVINCIAL AGENTS OF 
NORTH CAROLINA 



A great obstacle to a successful and peaceful government in 
North Carolina prior to the year 1748 was the lack of a medium 
in England through which the representatives of the people in 
the General Assembly could make known to the Crown and to 
the home authorities the needs, circumstances and desires of 
their constituents. This hindrance could be removed only by 
the appointment of an agent to represent and transact the busi- 
ness of the province at the various government boards in Eng- 
land. Colonel Saunders sums up the duties and responsibilities 
of such an agent admirably when he remarks : 

To appreciate the importance of the agent's position it must 
be remembered that the Crown had the right to pass upon all the 
acts of the Legislature, and to repeal or "disallow" such as might 
for any reason seem inexpedient. The proceedings in the case 
were, in brief, as follows, viz : The act was, in the first instance, 
sent by the Governor to the Secretary of State for America, by 
whom it was laid before the Lords of the Board of Trade and by 
them referred to the Reporting Counsel to the Board, to consider 
and report whether or not the King ought to be advised to assent 
to it. In practice, the fate of the act depended very much upon 
the report of the Counsel, who, in turn, was very much guided 
by the impressions he received as to the circumstances under 
which the Provincial Assembly passed the act, the evils it was 
intended to remedy, and the manner in which it was intended to 
operate. All these things the agent, from his knowledge of 
affairs in the Province, would be able to explain to the Counsel, 
and in many ways not merely prevent unfavorable misapprehen- 
sions on the part of the Counsel, but to lead his opinion to a 
report favorable to the wishes of the Province. With the report 
of their Counsel, the act came back to the Board of Trade where 
it was considered, after notifying the agent to attend in all mat- 
ters of consequence. With the report of the Board of Trade the 
act then went to the Lords of the Privy Council, upon whose 
final report its fate depended. These great officers also sought 
their information in the premises not from private individuals, 
but from these Provincial Agents, and without some person being 



64 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

in England in that capacity in behalf of a Province, its affairs 
"slept." Memorials, addresses, petitions and such like papers 
passed through his hands. Every opening for the encouragement 
of the trade of the Province, it was his business to improve it, 
and equally so to endeavor to obviate any scheme that might 
hurt it, and hence it was his duty to keep posted as to the inten- 
tions of Government and of Parliament, all of which involved 
much labor of various kinds and great responsibility. In a word, 
the agent was to the colony what the ambassador was to a foreign 
country. Now, from the very nature of the duties of the agent, 
it is apparent that he was intended to be the representative not 
of the Governor, but of the opposition, so that the authorities 
"at home" in England might get both sides of the questions 
presented to them. Otherwise, the representations made by the 
Governor would have decided matters. 1 

The first proposal that an agent should be appointed to repre- 
sent North Carolina in England was made by Governor Burring- 
ton in a speech to the Assembly in April, 1731. He declared that 
it was "absolutely necessary" to select an agent and arrange a 
regular salary for carrying on the public affairs of the province 
in England. 2 Shortly afterwards he repeated his recommenda- 
tion. 3 Burrington's efforts, however, came to naught and seven- 
teen years elapsed before the step was finally taken. 

In October, 1748, the General Assembly passed a law called 
"An Act to appoint an Agent to solicit the Affairs of this Pro- 
vince at the several Boards in England. ' ' James Abercromby, of 
London, was chosen agent for a term of two years — from March 
25, 1749, to March 25, 1751. He had already acted in this capa- 
city, for the act provides that "the said James Abercromby, Esq., 
in consideration of his trouble, charges and expenses, in trans- 
acting the public business of this Province, as agent, to this time, 
and until the twenty-fifth day of March, next ensuing, be and is 
hereby allowed the sum of one hundred pounds, sterling. ' ' This, 
however, was the first time that an agent was officially appointed 
to act during a fixed term. Abercromby was granted a salary of 
50£, sterling, annually. A committee, whose duty it was to cor- 
respond with and direct and advise the agent, was also chosen. 



1 Col. Rec, VI, vii-ix. 

2 Col. Rec, III, 258. 

3 Col. Rec, III, 280. 



The Provincial Agents of North Carolina 65 

The committee of correspondence, as it was called, was composed 
of Robert Halton and Eleazer Allen, of the Council, and Samuel 
Swann, John Starkey and John Swann, of the House of Com- 
mons. Whenever so ordered the committee should lay before the 
Governor, Council and Assembly the correspondence which had 
passed between it and the agent. 4 The mere fact that such able 
and influential men served on the committee of correspondence 
proves the great importance and responsibility of the office of 
agent. 

It having been "found very beneficial to the Province that a 
proper person should, by public authority, solicit and represent 
the affairs ' ' of the colony in England, and Abercromby 's term of 
office having expired, the Assembly of 1751 re-enacted the agency 
law of 1848 for a period of three years. Abercromby was retained 
as agent and James Hasell and John Dawson, of the Council, 
were selected to fill the vacancies in the committee of correspond- 
ence occasioned by the deaths of Halton and Allen. The yearly 
salary of 50£ had been found inadequate and was increased to 
100£. The sum of 111£ 9s. and 2d. was allowed Abercromby as 
compensation for extraordinary expenses incurred during his 
first term. 5 

In 1754 the agency act was extended again for a period of 
three years. 6 Upon the termination of Abercromby 's third term 
in 1757, the lower house was disinclined to appropriate any 
money for public services, for taxes were already very burden- 
some. Consequently no agent was appointed. 7 

It would be monotonous to enumerate all of Abercromby 's 
activities as agent. He performed several important services. 
When McCulloch, Morris, Corbin, Dobbs and others attacked 
Governor Johnston in 1749 and sought to compass his removal 
from the governorship, Abercromby successfully defended the 
Governor by cleverly delaying the proceedings before the Board 
of Trade. 8 He produced strong arguments favorable to an im- 



4 State Rec, XXIII, 303-304. 
6 State Rec, XXIII, 362-363. 

6 State Rec, XXIII, 399; State Rec, XXV, 266. 

7 Col. Rec, V, 788-789, 928, 988. 

8 Col. Rec, IV, 934-939, 942; Ashe, Hist, of N. C, 272. 



66 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

portant quit rent law passed by the Assembly, which Lamb, the 
Reporting Counsel to the Board of Trade, had disapproved. 
Altogether, he discharged the functions of his office in a most 
acceptable and efficient manner. In a letter to the Board of 
Trade, dated April 13, 1758, he informed the board that he 
was no longer agent for the colony and advised it to instruct 
the Governor to recommend to the Assembly the passage of an 
act to call in as much of the old paper currency as possible, to 
be paid off by the share of North Carolina in the grants which 
Parliament had made to reimburse the colonies for their appro- 
priations and aid in the war then being carried on against 
France and her Indian allies. 10 The suggestion contained much 
wisdom, because the provincial currency was greatly depre- 
ciated in value. 

The Parliamentary grants were two in number. The first 
was an appropriation of 200,000£, which was allotted to all of 
the colonies for distribution. The second amounted to 50,000£, 
which was to be distributed among the two Carolinas and Vir- 
ginia. In November, 1758, the Assembly convened and entered 
into a heated dispute with Governor Dobbs concerning the right 
to dispose of the share of the colony in the Crown's bounties. 
The house also contended that it had the right to name an agent 
and the committee of correspondence. The Assembly and the 
Governor were in utter disagreement. 11 

A bill was introduced at this session for the location of the 
seat of government at Tower Hill, near Stringer's Ferry, on the 
Neuse — a site which Dobbs had chosen — and for the erection of 
a state house, a secretary's office and a residence for the Gover- 
nor should he decide to reside there. Another bill which was 
introduced provided for the enlistment of three hundred soldiers 
to serve against the French, the bringing over in specie of the 
colony's share of the royal grants and putting the same into the 
custody of the provincial treasurers, and for the appointment of 
an agent. A committee of correspondence, composed entirely of 



Col. Rec, V, 448-456. 

10 Col. Rec, V, 928-929. 

"Col. Rec, VI, x, 1-3; Ashe, Hist, of N. C, 294. 



The Provincial Agents of North Carolina 67 

members from the lower house, was named in the bill and Aber- 
cromby was to be the agent. 12 

The Governor regarded the first bill as a scheme to persuade 
him to give his assent to the second, and said that the lower 
house would even have paid his house rent and the expenses 
which he incurred in attending the Congress at Philadelphia in 
order to obtain his approval of it. Dobbs also charged several 
of the leaders of the house and the two treasurers with having 
arranged a plan whereby they would get ' ' our proportion of the 
sum which his Majesty had graciously recommended to Parlia- 
ment to reimburse the southern colonies, which they expected 
would be at least 15,000f , into their custody under the direction 
of the Assembly, which they ruled, and so apply it as they 
thought proper, without his Majesty or the Governor or the 
Council's interfering in it." Dobbs objected to the bill on 
the ground that it was an encroachment upon the rights of the 
Governor and Council, and not in conformity to the powers of 
the Assembly. He thought it improper and illegal to tack on 
the aid bill the sections dealing with the appointment of an 
agent and with the royal grants. He desired, however, to have 
the bill locating the capitol at Tower Hill enacted. The mem- 
bers of the Assembly declared that the bill which Dobbs wished 
to pass should not pass unless the other bill went "hand and 
glove" with it. 13 

Being determined to defeat the one and to pass the other, 
Dobbs resorted to a very clever stratagem. He instructed his 
followers in the Council not to oppose the aid bill, except in 
some insignificant matters of amendment until it had passed the 
third reading in the house and had been sent to the upper house 
for ratification. When both bills had passed the third reading 
in the house, he made it clear to the members of the Council that 
he desired the aid bill defeated by saying that he ' ' wanted their 
advice whether to pass a bill of an extraordinary nature which 
affected his Majesty's prerogative and the rights of the Gover- 
nor and Council," and which was contrary to the instructions 



12 Col. Rec, V, 1087; Col. Rec, VI, 1-3. 

13 Col. Rec, VI, 1-3. 



68 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

which he had received from the authorities in England. The 
strategy succeeded. The bill locating the capitol at Tower Hill 
was passed, but the Council, under Dobbs' influence, deferred 
action on the aid bill for several days, by which time the Gover- 
nor was to prorogue the Assembly. Governor Dobbs described 
the result in this manner : 

Upon this disappointment the lower house were all in a 
flame, the managers being greatly disappointed, and represented 
to me that there must be a dissolution unless the upper house 
would resume the bill, desiring I would speak to the Council to 
revoke their resolution and pass the bill. 

The Governor, of course, declined to interfere. He agreed 
to join with the house in recommending that the money already 
due Abercromby for his services as agent be paid out of the 
Parliamentary grants. 14 Thereupon the lower house appointed 
James Abercromby its own agent for two years with an annual 
salary of 150£, to be paid out of the colony's portion of the 
50,000£ bounty. Sam Swann, Thomas Barker, John Starkey, 
George Moore and John Ashe, all members of the house, were 
appointed committee of correspondence. The house adopted an 
address congratulating the Crown upon the victories won from 
the French and praying that a part of the sum allotted North 
Carolina should be used in establishing free schools in each 
county. Then Dobbs prorogued the Assembly. 15 

At its next sitting the council chose Samuel Smith, of Lon- 
don, Dobbs' private attorney, as agent. 16 The province now 
had two agents, neither of whom legally occupied the office. An 
agent appointed by one house only lacked authority and was 
unable to represent the colony as it ought to have been repre- 
sented. 

In the spring of 1759, urgent calls for troops were made upon 
Governor Dobbs, for the army in the North stood in dire need 
of re-enforcements. Dobbs called the Assembly to meet at New- 
bern on the 8th of May. 17 The house almost immediately passed 



14 Col. Rec, VI, 2-3; Ashe, Hist, of N. C, 295. 

16 Col. Rec, VI, 2-3, 9, 76; Ashe, Hist, of N. C, 295. 

10 Col. Rec, VI, 77. 

"Ashe, Hist, of N. C, 295. 



The Provincial Agents of North Carolina 69 

an aid bill similar to the one defeated by Dobbs at the pre- 
ceding session. The forces of the province were to be increased 
to three hundred men, exclusive of officers. An aid of 6,000£ 
was to be granted for enlisting and maintaining this force, and 
Abercromby was to be appointed agent. He was to present 
documents to the English government showing the expense North 
Carolina had been at in affording assistance against the enemy. 
Upon being properly bonded, Abercromby was to receive from 
the English authorities the portion of the 50,000£ grant assigned 
to the province and transmit the same to the provincial treasurers 
after deducting the sum due him for previous services and so 
much as might be necessary to defray the cost of insurance and 
shipment to the treasurers of the colony. The committee of cor- 
respondence was to be composed entirely of members of the 
lower house. 18 The council wished to amend the bill by elimi- 
nating the sections which dealt with the appointment of an 
agent. The house refusing to agree to the amendment, the coun- 
cil declined to pass the bill and the session was adjourned with- 
out any measures having been passed. 10 

The Board of Trade disagreed with Dobbs in most of the 
positions which he took in the controversy with the house. Al- 
though it could not do otherwise than approve of his having de- 
feated the bill, the Board informed Dobbs that the aid bill did 
not lessen the Crown's prerogative to the extent he feared. The 
Board affirmed the contentions of the lower house that the As- 
sembly had the right to appropriate the funds granted the pro- 
vince by Parliament and that it had the inherent right to name 
the agent. Though it saw no reason for disapproving the bill 
in its abstract principles, the Board ruled that the appointment 
of an agent, being separate from the aid bill, ought to have been 
provided for in a separate act and that the committee of cor- 
respondence should have been composed of members of both 
houses. 20 

A new Assembly was called to meet in April, 1760. The chief 
purpose for calling this meeting was to have an aid bill passed 



18 Col. Rec, VI, 37-38, 102-103. 

19 Ashe, Hist, of N. C, 295. 

20 Col. Rec, VII, 54-55. 



70 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

so that the province might afford assistance in the military cam- 
paigns then being planned. In his speech to the Assembly the 
governor recommended the election of an agent to receive and 
remit the share of the colony in the grants of the Crown. 21 
Owing to the failure of the governor and the Assembly to agree 
upon a suitable law establishing courts, there had been no courts 
in the province for several months and much disorder had arisen 
in Edgecombe, Halifax and Granville Counties. Being anxious 
to pass a law establishing and regulating courts, the Assembly 
determined not to pass an aid bill until an act creating superior 
courts should be passed. Dobbs was equally resolved not to let 
the house have its way. 22 

The quarrel waxed warmer. On May 23, the house went into 
a committee of the whole and resolved that if any member should 
make known to any person the remarks of any member in any 
debate or proceeding in the house, he should be expelled from 
his seat as being unworthy of it. In this secret session, the Assem- 
bly adopted twenty resolutions setting forth the arbitrary con- 
duct of the governor. An address to the Crown was drawn up 
complaining of abuses perpetrated by the governor, describing 
the unsatisfactory conditions prevalent in the province and 
declaring that Dobbs' influence over the council had prevented 
the colony from having an agent in England. The address as- 
serted that the real cause for the council's rejection of the aid 
bill of the last session and of the governor's displeasure with it 
was that it did not name as agent Dobbs' private attorney, Mr. 
Smith. 23 

Being brought to reason by the drastic action of the As- 
sembly, Dobbs promised to assent to a court law which should 
not be in force for more than two years unless ratified by the 
Crown provided the Assembly passed an aid bill. The court bill 
received the assent of the governor, but being dissatisfied with 
some of the provisions of the aid bill and deeming it no longer 
necessary, Dobbs refused to give his assent to it. 24 It seems that 



21 Col. Rec, VI, 347. 

22 Col. Rec, VI, 408-409; Ashe, Hist, of N. C, 287-298. 

23 Col. Rec, VI, 409-415. 

24 Ashe, Hist, of N. C, 298-299. 



The Provincial Agents of North Carolina 71 

Robert Jones, a lawyer, was selected as agent in the defeated aid 
bill. 25 

A.t the same time the council refused to approve a bill naming 
Abercromby agent. 26 Thereupon the Assembly chose Anthony 
Bacon, a merchant of London. 27 The council declined to sanc- 
tion this selection and asked that five of its members be put upon 
the committee of correspondence. It was also requested that all 
business to be transacted with the agent must be approved by 
three members of the committee from each house. Upon the 
refusal of the house to amend the bill as proposed, the council 
rejected it. 2S 

The house appointed Bacon as its agent for a term of two 
years and resolved "that Samuel Swann, John Starkey, George 
Moore and John Ashe, or any three of them" constitute the 
committee of correspondence. 29 

Dobbs postponed the meeting of the Assembly until Septem- 
ber. The beginning of hostilities between the Cherokees and the 
frontiersmen rendered it imperative to call the meeting in mid- 
summer. In this emergency measures were taken for the de- 
fense of the colony. 30 The council tabled a bill providing for 
the appointment of an agent. 31 

At the next session of the Assembly, which was held in No- 
vember, 1760, the house addressed the governor saying : 

We flatter ourselves, had we been so fortunate as to have had 
the concurrence of the other branches of the legislature in pass- 
ing a law (more than once attempted) for appointing an agent 
in London, who might have produced proper documents of our 
expenses and represented our duty and zeal for his Majesty's 
service (considering our circumstances), in their true light to 
his Majesty's ministers, we should have been in expectation of 
partaking of his Majesty's royal grace and favour out of the 
first 200,000£ granted by Parliament to the colonies, and of 



25 Col. Rec, VI, 297. 

20 Col. Rec, VI, 423, 424. 

27 Col. Rec, VI, 429. 

28 Col. Rec, VI, 423-424. 

29 Col. Rec, VI, 436. 

30 Ashe, Hist, of N. C, 301. 

21 Col. Rec, VI, 444. 



72 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

which Virginia has received 20,546£ as her proportion exclusive 
of 32,268£ and 19s. out of the 50,000£ grant ; whereas the whole 
coming to this Province is not more than 7,789£ Is. Id. sterling ; 
and even out of which, there is a demand of 1,000£, as j^our 
Excellency informs us, that was advanced by Lord Loudoun, and 
Mr. Shirley, to pay the forces at New York notwithstanding a 
sufficient fund raised by this Province ; and therefore we can- 
not help being of opinion that the small part of his Majesty's 
royal bounty coming to this Colony is apparently owing to the 
want of an agent to represent our dutiful behaviour to his 
Majesty and his ministers. 32 

The fact that North Carolina did not have an agent in Eng- 
land was due to Dobbs' defeat of the various aid bills whereby 
an agent would have been appointed. North Carolina had ex- 
pended about 66,000£ in assisting in waging the war. More than 
half of this amount had been spent for services outside the pro- 
vince and the colony had justly expected to receive a consider- 
able amount of the royal grants. Dobbs' persistent refusal to 
concur in the appointment of an agent resulted in great financial 
loss to the colony. 33 

Following the address of the house to the governor, both 
houses passed an act which granted an aid for operations against 
the enemy and appointed Bacon agent to lay before the English 
authorities documents showing the expense the colony had in- 
curred in the war. 34 This act was disapproved of by the gover- 
nor. He adjourned the Assembly for two days that it might 
reconsider and expunge the "foreign" clauses and name an 
agent who would not be objectionable to him. This advice was 
accompanied by a threat to dissolve the Assembly. 35 

In a committee of the whole, the house resolved that the 
naming of an agent was its inherent right and that the appoint- 
ment of an agent at that time, even if inserted in an aid bill, 
was not inconsistent with the services of the Crown. An address 
was presented to Dobbs in which these resolutions were reiter- 



32 Col. Rec, VI, 477. 

33 Col. Rec, VI, ix-x. 

34 Col. Rec, VI, 463. 
36 Col. Rec, VI, 515. 



The Provincial Agents of North Carolina 73 

ated and in which the house stated that its members regretted 
that the governor's private resentment against whomever it 
named as agent should frustrate all efforts to unite with Vir- 
ginia and South Carolina in an attack upon the Cherokees. The 
house refused to strike Bacon's name out of the bill. 30 The bill 
was re-introduced and passed the third reading in each house, 
but did not become law because Dobbs dissolved the Assembly 
before it was presented for his approval. 37 The dangers of an 
Indian invasion had ceased by this time. 38 

The new Assembly convened at Wilmington in March, 1761, 
and upbraided the governor for his defeat of the aid bill and for 
not calling the Assembly to meet at a more convenient place. 39 
Both sides, however, were now willing to yield something in 
order to accomplish their respective ends. 

A bill appropriating 20,000£, proclamation money, for the 
enlistment and support of five hundred soldiers and naming 
Cuchet Jouvencal, of Westminister, England, agent was passed. 
John Swann, Lewis deRossett, and Maurice Moore, of the coun- 
cil, and Samuel Swann, John Ashe, John Starkey, Cornelius 
Harnett and Francis Corbin, of the house, were appointed to 
constitute the committee of correspondence. 40 The house re- 
frained from selecting Bacon merely to obtain the assent of the 
governor. 41 The council advised Dobbs to assent to the act and 
having done so, the governor dissolved the Assembly. 42 

Meanwhile the Board of Trade informed Dobbs that he had 
no right to interfere in the nomination of an agent by the As- 
sembly and that although naming an agent in the aid bill which 
he had rejected at the last session was irregular, the necessity 
of the times rendered the irregularity too trivial a reason for 
rejecting a law which would have been beneficial to the Crown 
and to the province. 43 

Sir Matthew Lamb, Reporting Counsel to the Board, criticised 



30 Col. Rec, VI, 515-517. 

37 Col. Rec, VI, 518-519. 

38 Ashe, Hist, of N. C, 301. 
30 Ashe, Hist, of N. C, 302. 

40 State Rec, XXIII, 539-541. 

41 Col. Rec, VI, 692. 

42 Col. Rec, VI, 633-634, 694. 

43 Col. Rec, VI, 539. 



74 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

the tacking on to the aid bill of the clauses nominating Jouvencal 
agent as being irregular. 44 Thereupon the Board instructed 
Dobbs to recommend the appointment of an agent in a separate 
bill when Jouvencal 's term should expire. 45 

At the session early in 1764, John Starkey introduced a bill 
to continue the agency of Jouvencal for eighteen months, but 
the quarrel between the two houses concerning the membership 
of the correspondence committee caused the failure of the 
measure. 40 By their own authority the house appointed Jou- 
vencal its agent and named as committee of correspondence 
John Ashe, John Starkey, Cornelius Harnett, Francis Corbin 
and Maurice Moore. 47 

Later in the year the Assembly made another effort to have 
an agent appointed with the concurrence of the governor and 
council. Thomas Barker, an eminent resident of the colony, was 
chosen by the house, but the council substituted another person 
in his place. 4S When the lower house reinserted the name of 
Thomas Barker in the bill, the council rejected it. 49 The As- 
sembly took vengeance on the council by refusing to appropriate 
1,000£ to pay Samuel Smith who had been named as agent of 
the province by the governor and the council in 1759. The 
house correctly decided that Smith had never been the agent of 
the province. 50 

The inability of the different branches of the government to 
agree upon the choice of an agent had already worked much woe 
to the affairs of the province before the governmental authori- 
ties of England. The council and the governor were in the 
wrong, for the Board of Trade had declared that the power of 
naming an agent was vested in the Assembly. It seems that the 
Board of Trade recognized the agents appointed solely by the 
house during the time of the quarrel. 

In May, 1765, the house refused to submit to the council the 



"Col. Rec, VI, 748. 

45 Col. Rec, VI, 702-703. 

46 Col. Rec, VI, 1134, 1136, 1137, 1214. 
« Col. Rec, VI, 1214. 

48 Col. Rec, VI, 1287-1288. 

*° Col. Rec, VI, 1240. 

00 Col. Rec, VI, 1251-1252, 1313, 1316-1317. 



The Provincial Agents of North Carolina 75 

letters and papers which it had received from Jouvencal since 
the last sitting of the legislature. Governor Tryon wrote the 
Board of Trade that the Assembly's agent ought not to be 
recognized by the Board unless the house would permit some 
members of the council to serve on the correspondence com- 
mittee. 51 

The Assembly continued the agency of Jouvencal for one 
year. 52 The Board of Trade accepted Tryon 's advice and no 
member of the council having been placed upon the committee of 
correspondence, refused to recognize the agent. No agent was 
appointed from this time until 1768. 53 

The gist of the quarrel was that the council denied the 
Assembly the right of naming the agent, while the house refused 
to allow the council a proper share in the committee of corre- 
spondence. 

In 1767, Henry Eustace McCulloch, a member of the council 
then residing in England, offered his services as agent to the 
colony. 54 

An attempt to elect an agent early in the following year 
failed. 55 

Towards the end of the year, the house, by a resolve appoint- 
ed McCulloch agent with John Harvey, Joseph Montfort, 
Samuel Johnston, Joseph Hewes and Edward Vail as the corre- 
spondence committee. 56 

Parliament having adopted the plan of taxing the colonies to 
help raise funds to pay the war debt, the Assembly drew up an 
address protesting against such taxation. In writing to McCul- 
loch, the committee of correspondence characterized Parliamen- 
tary taxation as "totally unconstitutional and destructive of the 
natural right of mankind. ' ' McCulloch was instructed to assure 
the king, the ministry and Englishmen in general of the loyalty 
of North Carolina to the Crown, to present the address of the 
Assembly to the king, to cooperate with the agents of other 



51 Col. Rec, VI, 107. 

62 Col. Rec, VI, 60, 87. 

63 Ashe. Hist, of N. C, 312. 

54 Col. Rec, VII, 517-518. 

55 Col. Rec, VII, 641. 
66 Col. Rec, VII, 973. 



76 James Sprunt Historical Publications 

colonies in obtaining the repeal of the act imposing internal 
taxes on America and to work for the repeal of the law of 
Parliament which forbade the colonies to issue paper money. 57 
Samuel Johnston considered the address too submissive and 
with Joseph Hewes declined to serve on the committee of corre- 
spondence. 58 

The dissatisfaction among the people on the frontier of the 
province resulted in the formation of the Regulation movement. 
In October, 1769, in a petition to the legislature setting forth 
their grievances, the Regulators of Anson County asked that 
"Doctor Benjamin Franklin or some other known patriot" be 
appointed agent of the colony in England. 59 

McCulloch informed the Assembly that its address had reach- 
ed its destination and that he would gladly carry out the in- 
structions given him. 60 

Tryon was authorized to sanction the appointment of an 
agent elected by both houses to represent the affairs of the pro- 
vince before the authorities in England. The critical relations 
subsisting between the colonies and the mother country ren- 
dered it necessary that an agent should be appointed in such a 
manner as to give him unmistakable authority. Otherwise, the 
interests of the colony would be doomed to delay and disap- 
pointment. 01 

In the autumn of 1769, the two houses appointed H. E. 
McCulloch agent for a term of two years with an annual salary 
of 200£ sterling. Lewis Henry de Rossett, Alexander McCul- 
loch and Robert Palmer, of the council, and John Harvey, Joseph 
Montfort, Edward Vail, John Campbell and Benjamin Harvey, 
of the house, were selected as the committee of correspondence. 62 
Tryon approved the act. 63 

Late in 1771, McCulloch was re-appointed for an additional 
term of two years and the committee of correspondence was com- 



57 Col. Rec, VII, 877-879. 

68 Ashe, Hist, of N. C, 347-348. 

69 Col. Rec, VIII, 78. 

60 Col. Rec, VIII, 55-57. 

01 Col. Rec, VII, 868. 

02 State Rec, XXV, 518. 

03 Col. Rec, VIII, 151. 



The Provincial Agents op North Carolina 



77 



posed of members from both houses. 04 McCulloch was the last 
agent to represent the colony in the mother country. Being 
familiar with the situation in the province and in England, he 
was well qualified to render the colony much service. This he 
did. 

As we have seen, the office of agent was of vast importance 
and responsibility. The constant bickering between the lower 
house and the governor and between the house and the council 
resulted in much loss and damage to the interests of the pro- 
vince in England. 




64 State Rec, XXIII, 854. 



5 9549 134